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FAQ

This is the list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) related to the activities of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29). It attempts to answer the most frequently asked questions relating to WP.29, its subsidiary bodies and the Agreements under its administration.

 

GENERAL QUESTIONS RELATED TO WP.29 AND ITS SUBSIDIARY BODIES

What is WP.29?

WP.29 was established on 6 June 1952 as the Working Party on the Construction of Vehicles, a subsidiary body of the Inland Transport Committee (ITC) of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). In March 2000, WP.29 became the "World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29)". The objective of the WP.29 is to initiate and pursue actions aimed at the worldwide harmonization or development of technical regulations for vehicles. Providing uniform conditions for periodical technical inspections and strengthening economic relations worldwide, these regulations are aimed at:
- improving vehicle safety;
- protecting the environment;
- promoting energy efficiency and
- increasing anti-theft performance.

WP.29 currently administers three UN Agreements, namely:

1. UN 1958 Agreement concerning the Adoption of Uniform Technical Prescriptions for Wheeled Vehicles, Equipment and Parts which can be Fitted and/or be Used on Wheeled Vehicles and the Conditions for Reciprocal Recognition of Approvals Granted on the Basis of these Prescriptions;
2. UN 1998 Agreement concerning the Establishing of Global Technical Regulations for Wheeled Vehicles, Equipment and Parts which can be Fitted and/or be Used on Wheeled Vehicles;
3. UN 1997 Agreement concerning the Adoption of Uniform Conditions for Periodical Technical Inspections of Wheeled Vehicles and the Reciprocal Recognition of such Inspections.

(More information on the global role of WP.29 and its organization can be found either in the WP.29 publication "WP.29 How it works – How to join it" at the address: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29pub.html
or on the WP.29 homepage: www.unece.org/trans/main/welcwp29.htm)

What is "Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations"?

Vehicles which are sold and put into service in a country have to meet the regulations and standards of that country. The registration procedure of that country requires the approval of the vehicle and/or its components. The existence of separate national regulations and approval procedures in the different countries requires expensive design modifications, additional tests and duplicating approvals. Thus, there is the need to harmonize the different national technical requirements for vehicles and to elaborate a unique international regulation. Once the vehicle or its equipment and parts are manufactured and approved according to that regulation, they can be internationally traded without further tests or approvals. Furthermore, these regulations have to be continuously adapted to the technical progress and to the new requirements regarding safety and environmental protection.

In order to reduce international trade barriers and to promote the global trade of vehicles and their components, efforts are being made to have harmonized vehicle regulations worldwide. The major forum for this role is the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE).

(more: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29pub.html)

How to join WP.29?

Any country member of the United Nations and any regional economic integration organization set up by member countries of the United Nations, may participate, fully or in a consultative capacity, in the activities of WP.29 and become a Contracting Party to the Agreements administered by WP.29.
The official process for becoming a participant is simply to send a letter signed by the authorized official of an interested country or regional economic integration organization (REIO) notifying the secretariat of WP.29 of the desire of that country or REIO to send representative(s) to the meetings and to participate in the activities of WP.29.

Signing one of the Agreements administered by WP.29 is not a prerequisite for participation in WP.29 activities. In order to participate in a session of WP.29 or its subsidiary bodies, the delegates have to complete the registration form attached to the agenda of the concerned session, and to transmit it to the UNECE secretariat, either by fax (+41-22-917-0039) or by email (nelly.enonler@unece.org). Prior to the session, delegates are requested to present themselves at the Pass and Identification Unit of the UNOG Security and Safety Section, located at the Villa Les Feuillantines, 13, Avenue de la Paix, for the issuance of an identification badge. The registration forms (long duration expert forms or conference registration form) or a map can be consulted or downloaded from the following website: www.unece.org/trans/registfr.html

Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) may also participate in a consultative capacity in WP.29 and its subsidiary bodies. In order to participate in WP.29 activities, an NGO must first be accredited as a consultative status to the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC). More information about the accreditation procedure can be consulted here: www.un.org/esa/coordination/ngo/

Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) that are not yet accredited may also participate, at the invitation of the UNECE secretariat or the concerned group's Chairman based on a concrete justification, in a session of WP.29 or one of its subsidiary bodies.
Other practical information for delegates can be consulted here:
www.unece.org/meetings/practical.htm

How WP29 works?

The UNECE Transport Division carries out the day-to-day management of the activities of WP.29 and its subsidiary bodies. Thus, the secretariat provides the administrative servicing for all sessions of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations and its subsidiary bodies, including the preparation of the agendas, working documents and reports.

Four Committees as mentioned below coordinate the activities of WP.29:
AC.1 - Administrative Committee for 1958 Agreement
AC.2 - Administrative Committee for the Coordination of Work
AC.3 - Executive Committee for 1998 Agreement
AC.4 - Administrative Committee for 1997 Agreement

AC.1, AC.3 and AC.4 are the Administrative/Executive Committees for the Agreements administered by WP.29, constituting all Contracting Parties of the respective Agreements.
The coordination of work of the World Forum is managed by a small Steering Committee (AC.2) comprising the Chairperson and secretariat of WP.29, the Chairperson of the Executive Committees of the 1958, 1997 and 1998 Agreements administered by WP.29, the representatives of the European Community, Japan and the United States of America, and the Chairperson of WP.29's subsidiary bodies (GRs or Working Parties).

The duties of AC.2 are to develop and recommend to WP.29 a Programme of Work, to review the reports and recommendations of WP.29's subsidiary bodies, to identify items that require action by WP.29 and the time frame for their consideration, and to provide recommendations to WP.29.
(more information can be found in the "Rules of procedure of WP.29" on pages 33 to 40 of the WP.29 publication "WP.29 How it works – How to join it" at the address: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29pub.html)

What are subsidiary bodies of WP.29?

The permanent subsidiary bodies of WP.29, also known as GRs (Groups of Rapporteurs), assist the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations in researching, analyzing and developing requirements for technical regulations in the areas of their expertise. There are six subsidiary bodies as mentioned below:
1. Working Party on Noise (GRB)
2. Working Party on Lighting and Light-Signalling (GRE)
3. Working Party on Pollution and Energy (GRPE)
4. Working Party on Brakes and Running Gear (GRRF)
5. Working Party on General Safety Provisions (GRSG)
6. Working Party on Passive Safety (GRSP)

Each subsidiary body consists of people whose expertise is relevant to the area covered by the body. All the proposals to WP.29 for new Regulations or amendments to existing UN Regulations are referred by the World Forum to its subsidiary bodies for preparation of technical recommendations. In view of the significance of the role of these subsidiary bodies, these have been given permanent status under UNECE and have been recently renamed as "Working Parties". All the documents (agendas, working documents and reports) of the sessions of WP.29 and its subsidiary bodies can be consulted or downloaded from the WP.29 website. (more: www.unece.org/trans/main/welcwp29.htm)

The organization of the World Forum and its subsidiary bodies is shown in the chart below:

How often do the meetings of WP.29 and its subsidiary bodies take place?

The sessions of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations are held three times a year. Those of the subsidiary bodies are held twice a year by each of them. The AC.2 meetings are held prior to each WP.29 session. A tentative list of all meetings of the Inland Transport Committee and its subsidiary bodies can be consulted and downloaded from the following website: www.unece.org/trans/meetings.html).
The agenda of a session is available on the WP.29 website at least 10 weeks before the session.

The agenda of a WP.29 session can be consulted and downloaded from the address: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29age.html

The agenda of a session of one of its subsidiary bodies can be consulted and downloaded from the address: www.unece.org/trans/main/welcwp29.htm (by selecting in the left column the concerned subsidiary bodies).

Why there are two Agreements for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations?

The United States of America and Canada follows a system of self-certification and thus, found it difficult to implement the mutual recognition of approvals, as required under the 1958 Agreement. In 1995, this Agreement was revised to introduce self-certification, as an alternative to the type approval, and to open it to all members of the United Nations and Regional Economic Integration Organizations that participate in UNECE activities. Even after that revision, the United States of America was not in a position to adhere to the 1958 Agreement. On initiatives taken by the United States of America, Japan and the European Community, the 1998 Agreement was then prepared to develop a global agreement for the harmonization of vehicle regulations. Appreciating the need for harmonization of regulations, the three partners proposed the 1998 Agreement (so-called Global Agreement) with the objective of involving countries from all parts of the world in the elaboration of global technical regulations (gtrs). Unlike the 1958 Agreement, the Global Agreement does not call for mutual recognition of approvals or certification.

What is the difference between EU Directives, UN Regulations and UN Global Technical Regulations (UN GTRs)?

Within the European Commission in Brussels, the Member States of the European Union (EU) initiate and elaborate EU Directives. These Directives are adopted by a qualified majority in a co-decision procedure by the Council of the EU and the European Parliament (EP). The EU Directives are binding, i.e. they are applicable on a mandatory basis by all the EU Member States.
In the framework of the United Nations' Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) in Geneva, WP.29 and its subsidiary bodies are developing the Regulations under the 1958 Agreement in cooperation with all Contracting Parties to the Agreement and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). UN Regulations are not applicable on a mandatory basis, but if a Contracting Party (C.P.) decides to apply a UN Regulation, the adoption becomes a binding act. A C.P. that has adopted a Regulation under the 1958 Agreement is allowed to grant type approvals pursuant to that Regulation and is required to accept the type approval of any other C.P. that has adopted the same Regulation.

The World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations and the European Commission are currently working on the harmonization between UN Regulations and EU Directives. Currently, some of the EU Directives are technically equivalent to UN Regulations or only refer to the requirements of the corresponding UN Regulation.

The UN GTRs are the technical regulations being established under the 1998 Agreement and will not refer to a type approval or certification procedure as mentioned in the EU Directives or UN Regulations. The UN Regulations are considered candidates for the elaboration of UN GTRs.

How can a country become a Contracting Party to an Agreement administered by WP.29?

A country can become a Contracting Party to one or more Agreement(s) administered by WP.29 by depositing an instrument of accession with the UN Secretary-General according the provisions of the following articles:
Article 6 of the 1958 Agreement;
Article 9 of the 1998 Agreement;
Article 4 of the 1997 Agreement.

(The text of the above-mentioned agreements are reproduced in Annexes II, III and IV of the WP.29 publication "WP.29 How it works – How to join it" here: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29pub.html)

 

QUESTIONS RELATED TO THE 1958 AGREEMENT (VEHICLE CONSTRUCTION REGULATIONS)

What is the 1958 Agreement?

The 1958 Agreement is an agreement made under UNECE with the objective of establishing uniform standards for vehicles and their components relating to safety, environment, energy and anti-theft requirements.

The title of the Agreement is: "Agreement concerning the adoption of uniform technical prescriptions for wheeled vehicles, equipment and parts which can be fitted and/or be used on wheeled vehicles and the conditions for reciprocal recognition of approvals granted on the basis of these prescriptions."

The Agreement aims at promoting the harmonization of Regulations and mutual recognition of approvals amongst Contracting Parties to the Agreement.
(more details can be found in the Terms of Reference of WP.29 at page 32 of the WP.29 publication "WP.29 How it works – How to join it" here:
http://www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29pub.html

The Agreement in its original form allowed participation of only UNECE members. The former title was "Agreement concerning the adoption of uniform conditions of approval and reciprocal recognition of approval for motor vehicle equipment and parts, done at Geneva on 20 March 1958"

It was revised in 1995 (Revision 2) to promote the participation of non-European countries and became a global agreement. Furthermore, the Agreement recognizes self-certification as an alternative to type approval and, therefore, does not preclude those countries whose rules and regulations are implemented through self-certification from becoming Contracting Parties. The amended text of the 1958 Agreement (Revision 2) entered into force on 16 October 1995. At the present time, there are 41 Contracting Parties (+ Ireland, Cyprus and Malta by virtue of the EC accession) to this Agreement.

The Regulations adopted under this Agreement are known as UN Regulations. At the present time, there are 127 UN Regulations in force. A list of the titles of all Regulations can be found on pages 6 to 13 of the status document TRANS/WP.29/343:
(see: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29fdocstts.html)


The text of the Agreement as well as all UN Regulations annexed to it can be consulted or downloaded here: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29regs.html

What is the concept of mutual recognition under the 1958 Agreement?

The mutual recognition of approvals provided under the 1958 Agreement aims at facilitating the international trade of vehicles and their components. If a component is type approved according to a UN Regulation by any of the Contracting Parties to the 1958 Agreement, all other Contracting Parties who have signed the same Regulation will recognize this approval.
This avoids repetitive testing and approval of components in various countries in which the latter are exported. This helps to reduce the time and costs of design, manufacture and approval as well as the entering into service of vehicles and their components. (more: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29pub.html)

Is it possible to have two levels of stringency in a Regulation existing concurrently under the 1958 Agreement? If yes, how does the mutual recognition of approvals take place?

Under the 1958 Agreement, there is no provision for distinct stringency levels in a Regulation. However, if a Regulation is amended and at least 1/5th of the Contracting Parties applying the unamended Regulation subsequently declare that they wish to continue to apply the Regulation not amended, the unamended Regulation is regarded as an alternative to the amended Regulation. Thus, it is formally incorporated in the Regulation.

In such a case, the Contracting Parties can choose which alternative they would like to accept. The Contracting Party opting for an earlier version will have to accept the approvals granted as per the latest amendments. However, the Contracting Party opting for the recent amendment is not obliged to accept the approvals granted for former versions of the Regulation.

Do all UN Regulations need to be adopted by a Contracting Party of the 1958 Agreement?

A Contracting Party to the 1958 Agreement can sign the UN Regulations in which it is interested, but it is not an obligation. It may even not adopt any of the UN Regulations.

Furthermore, a Contracting Party can cease applying any Regulation at any time giving one year’s notice. The approvals granted shall remain valid until their withdrawal.

The mutual recognition of approval is also applicable only for the Regulations adopted by a Contracting Party.

Are UN Regulations legally binding?

A UN Regulation in force binds legally all those Contracting Parties which signed the same Regulation. The date of entry into force of a Regulation or an amendment to a Regulation are given on the front page of the official document as well as in the status document TRANS/WP.29/343 (third column of the table on the even pages).

The Contracting Party which signed a Regulation may issue type approvals according to that Regulation and shall recognize the type approvals issued by all other Contracting Parties which signed the Regulation too. For more information please consult Article 12 of the 1958 Agreement: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29regs.html

Where can I find the latest amendments to a Regulation in force?

The latest version of a Regulation in force can be consulted or downloaded (in English, French or Russian) here: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29regs.html

In order to have the latest version of the provisions of a Regulation, the Revision as well as all the subsequent Corrigenda and Amendments to that Regulation have to be considered. The date of entry into force of a Regulation or an amendment to a Regulation are given on the front page of the official document as well as in the status document TRANS/WP.29/343 (third column of the table on the even pages).

After the publication of 4 or 5 amending documents, the secretariat is in general preparing a new consolidated version, which will be published as a new Revision to the Regulation.

Documents or Regulations which are not on the WP.29 website (Russian versions or obsolete text of former versions of Regulations, etc.) may be purchased on order by contacting:

Sales and Marketing Section
LDP/DPI, UNOG
Palais des Nations
CH-1211 GENEVA 10
Switzerland
Telefax: (+41-22) 91-70027
unpubli[at]unog.chl

or by consulting the following website: https://unp.un.org/

What is the present status of the 1958 Agreement regarding its Contracting Parties and the UN Regulations annexed to the Agreement? Where can I find the status document?

The present status of the 1958 Agreement is explicitly laid down in the trilingual document TRANS/WP.29/343 (English, French and Russian). This voluminous document (more than 300 pages) lists all Contracting Parties to the Agreement and all UNECE Regulations in force annexed to the Agreement. Furthermore, it lists for each individual Regulation (on the odd pages) the Contracting Parties which signed the Regulation and the status of documents (on even pages) adopted by WP.29.

The status and the date of entry into force of a Regulation are indicated on the first page of the individual Regulation sheet. Each Regulation is issued as a separate addendum to the 1958 Agreement.

Every year, the secretariat prepares, for the March session of World Forum, a revision to that document. For the subsequent WP.29 sessions of June and November, the secretariat prepares an addendum to the document in order to bring it up to date. The status document TRANS/WP.29/343 is available here: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29fdocstts.html

Where can I find the list and addresses of the Administrative Departments and Technical Services designated for a given Regulation?

Information about the Administrative Departments (that grants the approvals) and their assigned Technical Services (that carry out the testing and issue the test reports) can be found in the status document TRANS/WP.29/343 of the 1958 Agreement. This document lists for each Regulation the Contracting Parties which signed the Regulation and gives the codes of their Administrative Departments and Technical Services designated by the individual Contracting Party. The complete addresses of the Administrative Department and Technical Services, corresponding to the above-mentioned address codes, can be found in Annex 1 to the status document TRANS/WP.29/343.

The multilingual status document is available on the WP.29 website at the address (please note that this document is voluminous and has some 300 pages): www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29fdocstts.html

What are the differences between a Revision, Amendment or Corrigendum to a Regulation?

To adapt the 1958 Agreement to the progress in technology, to improve road safety and the protection of the environment and to further harmonize them, the Regulations are amended by:

…/Rev.X = a Revision of the text comprising all previous text(s) of the Regulation in force;

…/Amend.X = an amendment issued as a Supplement to the text of the Regulation in force or a new Series of amendments to the Regulation comprising the change of the approval mark;

…/Corr.X = a Corrigendum consists of editorial corrections of errors in the issued text. As the corrigenda are deemed made "ab initio", the date of entry into force indicates the date of adoption by the Administrative Committee AC.1.

With regard to the status document TRANS/WP.29/343 (data on UN Regulations, even pages), what is the difference between the document reference (first column) and the status of document (second column) of a Regulation?

In the list of relevant official documents of each individual Regulation (see table on even pages), the first column mentions the reference of the official document under which the original document or its amendment is published. The second column mentions the status of the technical prescriptions. Not all Supplements or Corrigenda are published in a single document. If there are subsequent Supplements or Corrigenda to a Regulation, they are published in a single document, i.e. an amendment which include several Supplements or Corrigenda.

Where can I find the latest version of documents adopted by WP.29?

In the list of relevant official documents of each individual Regulation (see status document TRANS/WP.29/343, table on even pages), the fourth column mentions the session of WP.29 at which the latest document was adopted by WP.29 and AC.1, the fifth column indicates the symbol (and paragraph number) of the corresponding WP.29 session's report (available here: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29rep.html) and the sixth column refers to the official document under which the original document or its amendment is published. All original documents, adopted by the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations, are available on the WP.29 website either:

- as a final document (listed by different series: http://www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29fdoc_s1000.html
- or as adopted working document (listed by the WP.29 session of its adoption: http://www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29ap_mar05.html)

Official working documents or their translations into the other official languages can also be consulted or downloaded from the public Official Document System (ODS) at the address: documents.un.org

When does an amendment to a Regulation come into force after its adoption by WP.29?

According to the provisions of Article 12 of the Agreement, an amendment to a Regulation will be considered to be adopted unless, within a period of six month from its notification by the Secretary-General, more than one-third of the Contracting Parties applying the Regulation at the time of notification have informed the Secretary-General of their disagreement with the amendment. Taking into account the time for the administrative work for the preparation of the document as well as for the notification procedure, an amendment will come in force about nine months after its adoption by WP.29 and AC.1.

Where can I find the latest information on agenda items still under discussion in one of the subsidiary bodies of WP.29? How can I submit an informal document to a Working Party?

The agenda of a session of one of its subsidiary bodies can be consulted and downloaded here: www.unece.org/trans/main/welcwp29.htm (by selecting in the left column the concerned Working Party).

Each agenda item refers, if appropriate, to the paragraph of the report of the previous session and lists all official working documents still under consideration by the Working Party. The outcome of the discussion of the previous session can be consulted in the report which is available on the corresponding website.

All participants in a Working Party may submit to the secretariat their comments or draft amendments regarding a specific agenda item in order to be considered by the experts of the Working Party. This document will be posted on the WP.29 website as an informal document to the specific session of the Working Party.

As part of the secretariat's efforts to reduce expenditure, all the relevant documents (agenda, reports, working documents, informal documents) distributed prior to the session by mail and/or placed on the above-mentioned UNECE website, will not be available in the conference room for distribution to session participants. Delegates are kindly requested to bring their copies of documents to the meeting.

How can a country become a Contracting Party to the 1958 Agreement and receive an UNECE country code?

The country may accede the 1958 Agreement according to the provisions of Article 6 of the Agreement by depositing an instrument of accession with the UNECE Secretary-General. The Agreement will enter into force on the sixtieth day after the deposit of the instrument of accession (Article 7). The Secretary-General will notify all the Contracting Parties of the date of entry into force of that accession (Article 14). The UNECE secretariat will communicate the country code number to the new Contracting Party. A country that became a Contracting Party may then apply either all UN Regulations annexed to the 1958 Agreement, only a part of them or none of them. When depositing its instrument of accession, any new Contracting Party may declare that it is not bound by certain Regulations then annexed to the Agreement (Article 1, para. 5). The Contracting Party which applies a Regulation shall communicate to the UNECE secretariat the names and addresses of the technical services responsible for conducting approval tests and of the administrative departments which grant approvals and to which forms certifying approval or refusal or withdrawal of approval issued in other countries are to be sent.

What is the Conformity of Production (COP) procedure?

Before granting a type approval pursuant to a Regulation annexed to the 1958 Agreement, the type approval authority of a Contracting Party has to proceed to an initial assessment of the manufacturer's production plant, i.e. verify the existence of satisfactory arrangements and procedures (such as standard ISO 9002) for ensuring effective control so that vehicles, equipment or parts when in production conform to the approved type. The type approval authority has to verify the existence of adequate arrangements and documented control plans, to carry out at specified intervals tests or associated checks necessary to verify continued conformity with the approved type, including, where applicable, the specific conformity of production (COP) tests laid down in the applicable Regulation.

The type approval authority that has granted type approval may at any time verify the conformity control methods applied in each production facility. The normal frequency of these verifications and the COP test procedure have to be consistent with the arrangements specified in Appendix 2 to the 1958 Agreement or according to COP provisions of the applicable Regulation annexed to the Agreement.

For more detailed information on the COP procedure, please consult Appendix 2 of the 1958 Agreement or the specific provisions for the conformity of production specified in the applicable Regulation at: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29regs.html.

 

QUESTIONS RELATED TO THE 1998 AGREEMENT (GLOBAL TECHNICAL REGULATIONS)

What is the 1998 Agreement?

The 1998 Agreement is a global agreement and runs parallel to the 1958 Agreement. It establishes a process through which countries from all regions of the world can jointly develop UN Global Technical Regulations (UN GTRs) for vehicles and their components.

The aim of the Agreement is to promote participation of various countries in the UN GTRs without recognizing mutual recognition of approvals or certification. Situation in May 2013: there are 33 Contracting Parties to the 1998 Agreement.

The title of the Agreement is: "Agreement concerning the establishing of global technical regulations for wheeled vehicles, equipment and parts which can be fitted and/or be used on wheeled vehicles", signed in Geneva on 25 June 1998.

The status of the 1998 Agreement is generally given in an informal document to the latest sessions of WP.29 and AC.3. That document is publicly available on the WP.29 website at the following address: http://www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/geninf135.html

On 17 November 2004, the Executive Committee (AC.3) of the 1998 Agreement established the first UN GTR on door locks and door retention components (UN GTR No. 1). In May 2013, 12 UN GTRs and their amendments have been established and the work on the elaboration of other UN GTRs is still in process within WP.29 and its subsidiary bodies. The UN GTRs and their amendments established, proposals for the elaboration of new UN GTRs as well as the format and guidelines for preparing new UN GTRs can be consulted and downloaded from the following WP.29 website: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29glob.html

What is the Compendium of Candidates?

The Compendium of Candidate UN Global Technical Regulations lists all national or regional regulations that are candidates for harmonization and adoption as UN GTRs. Any Contracting Party to the 1998 Agreement may submit a request to the Executive Committee for listing in the Compendium of Candidates of any technical regulation that the Contracting Party has applied, is applying or has adopted for future application. According to the provisions of Article 6.2 of the Agreement, all UN Regulations annexed to the 1958 Agreement are, in addition to the regulations listed in the Compendium of Candidates, also candidates for harmonization and adoption as UN GTRs.
For more detailed information, please consult Article 5 of the 1998 Agreement.

The compendium of Candidates is available at the following website address:
www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29glob_candidate.html

How is a UN Global Technical Regulation (UN GTR) established?

Any Contracting Party to the 1998 Agreement may submit to the Executive Committee (AC.3) a proposal to develop a UN GTR according to Article 6 of the 1998 Agreement.

If AC.3 agrees on the proposal, it is referred to an appropriate WP.29 Working Party in order to develop a text for the recommended UN GTR.
A list of proposals to develop UN GTRs (adopted by AC.3) and their detailed descriptions can be consulted or downloaded from the following website address:
www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29glob_proposal.html

Upon the mandate by AC.3, the Working Party is developing:
- either a new UN GTR concerning elements of performance or design characteristics not addressed by technical regulations in the Compendium of Candidates or by UN Regulations;
- or a harmonized UN GTR concerning elements of performance or design characteristics addressed either by the technical regulations listed in the Compendium of Candidates or by any UN Regulation or both;
taking into account the format and guidelines for preparing UN GTRs which are available on the following website address:
http://www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29glob_format.html

The Working Party is submitting to AC.3 the text of the UN GTR as well as a written report including its recommendations.
AC.3 will consider the establishment of a recommended UN GTR in accordance with Article 7. In the case of a consensus vote by AC.3 in favour of the UN GTR, it will be established in the Global Registry.
For more detailed information, please consult Article 6 of the 1998 Agreement.

What is the Global Registry?

The Global Registry is a list of all UN GTRs developed by WP.29 and voted by AC.3 (on the basis of a consensus vote in favour of the UN GTR). In May 2013, 12 UN GTRs are established in the Global Registry.

The Global Registry is publicly available here: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29glob_registry.html

Is it mandatory for a Contracting Party to the 1998 Agreement to accept all the UN GTRs?

A Contracting Party to the 1998 Agreement can adopt any UN GTR in which it is interested. A Contracting Party that votes in favour of establishing a UN GTR shall be obligated to submit the technical regulation to the process by its Government to adopt such a technical regulation into its own laws. However, it shall be free not to adopt this UN GTR, after this process, giving reasons for the decision. For more information, please consult Article 7 of the 1998 Agreement: http://www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp29glob.html

A Contracting Party can also decide to accept the products complying with a UN GTR without adopting the same into its own laws or regulations. (i.e. can adopt the UN GTR as an option to the domestic regulation).

 

QUESTIONS RELATED TO THE 1997 AGREEMENT (PERIODICAL TECHNICAL INSPECTIONS)

What is the 1997 Agreement?

The title of the 1997 Agreement is:
"Agreement concerning the adoption of uniform conditions for periodical technical inspections of wheeled vehicles and the reciprocal recognition of such inspections", done at Vienna on 13 November 1997.

In March 2013, there were 12 Contracting Parties to the 1997 Agreement and 17 signatories pending their ratification.
On 4 December 2001, UN Rule No. 1 regarding uniform provisions for periodical technical inspections of wheeled vehicles with regard to the protection of the environment entered into force. Also, on 3 February 2012, UN Rule No. 2 concerning the adoption of uniform conditions for periodical technical inspections of wheeled vehicles and the reciprocal recognition of such inspections entered into force.

The text of the Agreement as well as the annexed UN Rules Nos. 1 and 2 can be consulted or downloaded from the WP.29 website:
(see: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/wp291997.html)

The status of the 1997 Agreement is generally given in an informal document to the latest sessions of WP.29 and AC.4. This document is available on the WP.29 website at the following address: www.unece.org/trans/main/wp29/wp29wgs/wp29gen/geninf135.html