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January 2010

Full-body scanners are the latest security gadgets at airports and millions of containers may soon need to be scanned before they are boarded on ships. But what is currently being done to secure transport on roads, rail and inland waterways? How will the responsibilities for securing inland transport be divided between the public and private sectors?

When it comes to security, inland transport is the weakest link in global supply chains and, compared to other modes of transport, inland transport security has not received adequate attention.

These issues were discussed during the “Inland Transport Security Discussion Forum” organised by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) on 28-29 January 2010, in partnership with the Service Public Fédéral Mobilité et Transports of Belgium, the International Road Transport Union (IRU), the International Union of Railways (UIC) and the Transported Asset Protection Association (TAPA).

The security challenges facing inland transport range from terrorism, smuggling and trafficking to organized crime, petty theft and vandalism. To combat these problems, participants highlighted the need for freight security standards, driver training on security matters, government legislation and cooperation and the sharing of best practices across borders.

But this is, of course, easier said than done. With the global economic crisis, transport security has not been a priority. Furthermore, the issue of who will pay for increased security measure remains contentious: should it be the carrier, the producer, the consumer or governments? Some even suggest that inland transport crime is treated as “victimless” because it is assumed the companies who are hit the hardest can afford to foot the bill.

Not so, argued participants, who claim the costs of such crimes include loss of market share for those involved, loss of credibility for carriers as well as for countries, loss of customers and sales, insurance problems and poor health and safety conditions for staff members.

Furthermore, though increased security measures may be seen as obstacles to trade facilitation, they can in fact complement each other with a robust framework and proper implementation.

“The UNECE’s objective is to improve the security of transport systems by reducing the likelihood of transport being a target or used as a vehicle for terrorism. The way we go about that is by modifying legal instruments administered here and by making the UNECE platform available to national authorities to exchange information and co-ordinate actions,” said said Jan Kubis, Executive Secretary of UNECE in an opening address.

The two day meeting brought together around 100 representatives of governments, international organizations and the private sector to raise awareness for the issue, share experiences and discuss risk analysis and economic cost-benefit challenges.

UNECE legal instruments which contain security provisions include the carriage of dangerous goods, railways, vehicle regulations, infrastructure agreements and border crossings.

Topics which will be dealt with during the Discussion Forum included:

 

  1. Is there a need to enhance inland transport security?
  2. Are the responsibilities of the public and private sectors clear?
  3. What are the costs and benefits of security norms, standards and procedures?
  4. Are risk assessment techniques well-known and used?
  5. Is there demand for practical tools to enhance inland transport security?

For more information, please contact us on infotransport@unece.org

Presentations

 

Presentation No.1 - (Mr. Ján Kubiš) Opening remarks

English

PDF

Presentation No.2 - (Mr. David Reid) Transport security: costs, benefits and the way forward

English

PDF

Presentation No.3 - (Mr. Umberto de Pretto) Inland transport security: an IRU perspective

English

PDF

Presentation No.4 - (Mr. Tadeusz Kaczmarek) UIC Security Platform

English

PDF

Presentation No.5 - (Mr. Miroslaw Zielinski) Inland transport security: a view from the EC

English

PDF

Presentation No.6 - (Mr. Marc H. Juhel) World Bank’s supply chain security guide

English

PDF

Presentation No.7 - (Mr. Johan Pontén) Supply chain security: a trade facilitation perspective

English

PDF

Presentation No.8 - (Mr. Michael Schmitz) The World Customs Organization’s SAFE Framework of Standards: Progress Report

English

PDF

Presentation No.9 - (Mr. Eric Stewart) World Customs Organisation's SAFE Framework of Standards: the Multilateral Approach

English

PDF

Presentation No.10 - (Mr. Peter Krausz) The Industry Tools to Enhance International Freight Transport Security: TIR EPD, SAFETIR, CUTEWISE, BWTO, TRANSPark

English

PDF

Presentation No.11 - (Mr. Pere Padrosa) Secure Truck Parking Areas

English

PDF

Presentation No.12 - (Mr. Mark R. Miller) European Supply Chain Security (SCS) White Paper (WP): the European Organisation for Security (EOS)

English

PDF

Presentation No.13 - (Mr. Juha Hintsa) Standards in European supply chain security/anti-crime fight: CEN feasibility study

English

PDF

Presentation No.14 - (Prof. Gerd Neubeck) Rail security: a view from Deutsche Bahn

English

PDF

Presentation No.15 - (Mr. Gerhard Birkigt) Security: an operational point of view

English

PDF

Presentation No.16 - (Mr. Alfons Bartels) European Network of Police Co-operation

English

PDF

Presentation No.17 - (Mr. Martin Larcher) Blast effects and risk inside rail transport systems

English

PDF

Presentation No.18 - (Mr. Hinne Groot) SC.2 Rail security task force

English

PDF

Presentation No.19 - (Mr. Andrew Cook) Costs and benefits/economics

English

PDF

Presentation No.20 - (Mr. Yves Rougier) Regulatory guidelines

English

PDF

Presentation No.21 - (Ms. Marie-Helene Bonneau) Sharing good practices

English

PDF

Presentation No.22 - (Mr. Vidar Westrheim) Secure architecture – Securing Railways by Pro-active Design

English

PDF

Presentation No.23 - (Mr. Chris Humphrey) SOCA: strategies and objectives

English

PDF

Presentation No.24 - (Mr. Thorsten Neumann) Manufacturers’ perspective in applying security practices in the supply chain

English

PDF

Presentation No.25 - (Mr. Mark Schwarz) GPS monitoring: interfacing with law enforcement

English

PDF

Presentation No.26 - (Mr. Gal Messinger) The threat of counterfeiting in the supply chain

English

PDF

Presentation No.27 - (Mr. Gilad Solnik) Incident information sharing

English

PDF

 

Press Release and Interview

UNECE calls for renewed efforts to increase inland transport security (same text as above in PDF format)

UN Radio interview:

Как защитить от терактов наземный транспорт? (short version - Russian only)

Наземный транспорт тоже нуждается в защите (long version - Russian only)

  Photos
   
 

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