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GHS implementation

In order to monitor the status of implementation of the GHS, the secretariat has started to collect information publicly available from various sources (reports from members of the GHS Sub-Committee or NGOs, reports submitted to or issued by other United Nations organs, programs or specialized agencies (UNECE, UNITAR, IMO, ICAO, UNEP, WHO, ILO) or other intergovernmental organizations (European Commission, APEC), non-governmental organizations, as well as reports on various workshops, seminars, conferences and other events organized in relation with the implementation of the GHS.

This information has been compiled and summarized, country by country, on this page. Since implementation of the GHS is a dynamic process, this information will be regularly reviewed and completed on the basis of any new information made available.

Several international organizations as well as United Nations programmes and specialized agencies concerned with chemical safety in the field of transport or the environment, occupational health and safety, pesticide management and prevention and treatment of poisoning, are in the process of implementing the GHS by developing, amending or revising their relevant international instruments. Detailed information about the progress of the work in the different areas is given in this page, under "Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines".

Governments, and any other stakeholders, may submit any relevant information using the dedicated contact form. This information will be included on this webpage after verification by the secretariat. Of particular interest are the names of any legal instruments, codes or standards which have been adopted or amended to reflect the provisions of the GHS, their details (date of application, transitional period, publication details, internet address), and name and address of administrations responsible for their implementation.

Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Pesticide management: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) codes and guidelines

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) will promote the implementation of the GHS in the field of pesticides through three major activities:

  • The integration of the hazard classification principles of the GHS into the next revision of the FAO Guidelines on Pesticide Registration;
  • The integration of the labelling principles of the GHS into the next revision of the FAO Guidelines on Good Labelling Practice for Pesticides;
  • Awareness building and training of pesticide regulators, pesticide manufacturers and distributors, and pesticide users on the GHS, through FAO pesticide management programmes and in cooperation with others.

At its twelfth session, the Sub-Committee of experts on the GHS was informed about the results of a FAO questionnaire on the impact of the GHS on the labelling of agricultural pesticides.

The answers received showed that even though GHS implementation for pesticide labelling had been initiated in eight countries of three different regions, the majority of the countries still relied on the guidance provided by FAO and WHO (in particular the “WHO Recommended Classification of Pesticides by Hazard”) for the toxicological classification of pesticide products.

In view of the results of the questionnaire, the FAO Panel of Experts on Pesticide Management recommended that, as a transitional measure, both the existing WHO classification system and the new classification based on the GHS be included in the new “FAO Guidelines on Good Labelling Practice”. The Panel also concluded that, since the necessity of a single independent international source for the classification of pesticides had been identified, there was an urgent need to harmonize the GHS toxicological classification and the WHO classification of pesticides by hazard.

For more information, see document UN/SCEGHS/12/INF.18

Prevention and treatment of poisoning: World Health Organization (WHO) classification of pesticides

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified the following three major instruments as being the most relevant to GHS implementation:

1.

WHO Recommended classification of pesticides by hazard

 

WHO has updated the Recommended Classification of pesticides by hazard to take account of the GHS criteria. Its latest edition (2009) uses revised classification criteria which take account of the GHS categories for acute oral and dermal toxicity. The GHS acute oral toxicity category for each pesticide is also now presented in the publication.

2.

International Chemical Safety Cards (ICSC)

 

WHO started to include GHS classifications in new and updated ISCs in April 2006. To date, GHS classifications have been included on 350 ICSCs.

A new database for producing and disseminating ICSCs has now been developed. The revision of sentences required for the new database also necessitates significant revision of the Compiler's Guide. Where relevant, the classification criteria for the GHS are now incorporated in the decision process for determining the information which appears on each ICSC. The ICSCs have been identified as a mechanism for making GHS classifications of chemicals more widely available.

3.

WHO Chemicals publications

 

Information on GHS classification is now routinely included within published chemical evaluations from WHO, including Concise International Chemical Assessment Documents (CICADs) and Environmental Health Criteria (EHCs).

 

For more information, see document UN/SCEGHS/20/INF.30

Transport of dangerous goods: United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods

For the transport of dangerous goods, the GHS is implemented through the "UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods. Model Regulations" and the following transport legal international instruments:

(a)  International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code);
(b)  ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO TI);
(c)  European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR);           
(d)  Regulations concerning the International Transport of Dangerous Goods by Rail (RID);
(e)  European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Inland Waterways (ADN);

For the transport of dangerous goods, the GHS is implemented through the UN Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and the following transport legal international instruments:

The fourth revised edition of the GHS will be implemented during the period 2012-2013 once the transport legal instruments mentioned in (a) to (e) above made mandatory the provisions of the 17th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations.

Figures 1 and 2 summarize the relationship between the different revised editions of the GHS and the UN Model Regulations and its related transport legal instruments.

Table 1 summarizes the status of implementation of the GHS (Rev.4), by hazard class, through the UN Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (Rev.16) and the major legal instruments regulating transport of dangerous goods.

 

MARITIME TRANSPORT:

 

International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code)

Amendment 36-12 is harmonized (except as otherwise specified in table 1) with the 17th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations and will come into force on 1 January 2014 for two years although it may be applied in whole or in part, on a voluntary basis as from 1 January 2013. The IMDG Code is of mandatory application for 159 countries parties to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).

 

AIR TRANSPORT:

 

ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO TI)

The 2013-2014 edition of the ICAO TI is harmonized (except as otherwise specified in table 1) with the 17th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations and became applicable on 1 January 2013. The ICAO TI are of mandatory application for the 191 countries parties to the Convention on International Civil Aviation.

 

 

LAND TRANSPORT:

 

European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR)
(48 Contracting Parties) . The annexed regulations are also of mandatory application for domestic traffic in EU and EEA countries through European Directive 2008/68/EC (see note 1) and in the Russian Federation (Ordinance No.272 of 15 April 2011).

Regulations concerning the International Transport of Dangerous Goods by Rail (RID)
(43 Contracting Parties) (also of mandatory application for domestic traffic in EU and EEA countries through European Directive 2008/68/EC (see note 1)).

European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Inland Waterways (ADN)
At present, the Agreement has 17 Contracting Parties.

The Annexed Regulations are also of mandatory application for domestic traffic in EU and EEA countries through European Directive 2008/68/EC (see note 1) only for countries which are not linked by inland waterway to other EU countries.

The 2013 edition of RID/ADR/ADN (applicable since 1 January 2013) is harmonized except as otherwise specified in table 1 with the 17th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations.

Note 1: Directive 2008/68/EC applies to the transport of dangerous goods by road, by rail or by inland waterways within or between EU Member States. It makes direct reference to the relevant legal instruments implementing the provisions of the UN Model Regulations on the transport of Dangerous Goods by road, rail and inland waterways (i.e.: the European Agreement on the Transport of Dangerous Goods by road (ADR) and by inland waterways (ADN) and the Regulation concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by rail (RID)). 

The Directive entered into force on 20 October 2008. It continues to make ADR and RID applicable to road/rail transport of dangerous goods in the EU, and requires those States with inland waterways linked, by inland waterways, to waterways of other member States to apply the regulations annexed to ADN as from 1 July 2009 and at the latest by 1 July 2011 whether or not they are Parties to the ADN. Following its adoption, the following directives were repealed:

  1. Directives 94/55/EC and 96/49/EC (as amended) on the transport of dangerous goods;
  2. Directives 96/35/EC and 2000/18/EC on dangerous goods safety advisers; and
  3. Commission Decisions 2005/263/EC and 2005/180/EC (as amended) on national derogations from Directives 94/55/EC and 96/49/EC.

The annexes to the Directive are regularly adapted to take account of the amendments made to ADR/RID/ADN every two years. These adapations are usually referred to as "adaptations to scientific and technical progress" (see Commission Directives 2010/61/EU of 2 September 2010 and 2012/45/EU of 3 December 2012).

Environment: Basel Convention on the control of transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and their disposal

Basel Convention on the control of transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and their disposal

A joint correspondence working group between the Open-Ended working group of the Basel Convention on hazard characteristics and the Sub-Committee of experts on the GHS was established in 2005. The terms of reference of the correspondence group may be found in document UN/SCEGHS/9/INF.21.

Since the work assigned to the group was not completed at the end of the period 2005-2006, the Conference of the Parties decided (at its 8th meeting, which was held in Nairobi in December 2006) to extend the mandate of the Joint Correspondence Group so as to allow the work be continued during the biennium 2007-2008.

Information regarding the work of the joint correspondence group is available on the Basel Convention website (http://www.basel.int/techmatters/) under the heading "Hazard characteristics H10, H11". The Secretariat of the Basel Convention reports regularly on the progress of the work of the joint correspondence group to the Sub-Committee of experts on the GHS.

 

Implementation by country (67 countries listed)

Argentina

GHS implementation milestones

Transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
The Common Market of the South (MERCOSUR) countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay) are applying an agreement on the inland transport of dangerous goods (Acuerdo sobre Transporte de Mercancías Peligrosas en el MERCOSUR, 1994) which is based on the 7th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations and which is being updated on the basis of the 12th revised edition.

Other sectors

The Institute for the Standardization and Normalization (IRAM) published in 2006 a standard for the elaboration of Safety Data Sheets (IRAM 41400-2006) which is in line with the GHS requirements for SDS.
At regional level, as one of the members of the MERCOSUR Ad Hoc Group on chemicals (Environmental Area, sub-group 6) Argentina has identified GHS implementation as one of the six issues of highest priority in the region.

Australia

Work on implementation of the GHS is proceeding across various chemical regulatory sectors in Australia. Policy development in each of the key sectors is generally undertaken by an Australian Government agency, with implementation of the policy undertaken by Australian, State and Territory government agencies (nine governments).

The key sectors in Australia, which have historically evolved, are workplace chemicals, poisons, agricultural and veterinary chemicals, industrial chemicals, transport of dangerous goods and therapeutic goods. Most chemicals are captured by the scope of more than one sector. Progress towards implementation of the GHS across other chemical sectors in Australia is ongoing, with regular consultation occurring between policy developers and regulators of the different sectors.

Workplace

Focal point:

Safe Work Australia

Main relevant legislation:

Model Work Health and Safety (WHS) legislation. It consists of a Model WHS Act, supported by model WHS regulations and model Codes of Practice for consistent adoption by the nine Australian jurisdictions.

The Model WHS legislation adopts the third revised edition of the GHS for chemical hazard classification and hazard communication on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

Prior to the Model WHS Regulations, work health and safety legislation in the nine Australian jurisdictions was based on the following national material developed by the National Occupational Health and Safety Commission (one of Safe Works Australia predecessors):

  • National Model regulations for the control of Workplace hazardous Substances [NOHSC:1005(1994)];
  • National Standard for the Storage and Handling of Workplace Dangerous Goods [NOHSC:1015(2001)];
  • National Code of practice for the Preparation of Material Safety Data Sheets 2nd edition [NOHSC:2011(2003)];
  • National Code of practice for the Labelling of Workplace Substances [NOHSC:2012(1994)];
  • Approved Criteria for Classifying Hazardous Substances [NOHSC:1008(2004)];
  • List of Designated Hazardous Substances [NOHSC:10005(1999)];
  • Australian Code for the Transport of Dangerous Goods by Road and Rail [for dangerous goods classification]

GHS implementation status

Implemented

The model WHS Regulations implement the third revised edition of the GHS (GHS Rev.3) as the basis for chemical classification and hazard communication requirements.

During the 5 year transition period (from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016), manufacturers may use either the GHS for classification, labelling and SDS, or the previous hazardous substances and dangerous goods classification systems.

After 31 December 2016, all workplace chemicals must be classified according to the GHS and labels and SDS must be updated. Additional information about the transitional periods for classification, labelling and preparation of SDS is available here.

New Work Health and Safety laws commenced in New South Wales, Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, the Commonwealth and the Northern Territory on 1 January 2012 and will commence in Tasmania on 1 January 2013.

 

Transport of dangerous goods (except explosives)

Focal point:

Department of Infrastructure and Transport

Main relevant legislation:

The States and Territories have implemented the Model Subordinate Law on the Transport of Dangerous Goods by Road or Rail that also gives effect to the Australian Dangerous Goods Code 2007.

This model law, enacted by the States and Territories, regulates the transport of dangerous goods by road and rail and provides for the appointment and powers of authorized officers, exemptions and certain offences and penalties.

The Australian Dangerous Goods Code (7th edition) is based on the technical provisions contained in the UN Model Regulations for the Transport of Dangerous Goods.

Sea transport of dangerous goods is regulated by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority that applies the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code)

Air transport is regulated by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority that applies the ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods.

These Codes are based on the technical provisions contained in the UN Model Regulations for the Transport of Dangerous Goods.

GHS implementation status

Implemented
ADG7 allows GHS labelling of inner packagings of dangerous goods for transport and is harmonized with the 14th and 15th (for some provisions only) revised editions of the UN Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods.

Transport of explosives

Focal point:

Australian Forum of Explosives Regulators (AFER) with Safe Work Australia as Secretariat.

Main relevant legislation:

Commonwealth State and Territory Explosives Legislation; and
Australian Code for the transport of explosives by road and rail (Australian Explosives Code) (3rd edition);
Note:
Standards and Codes may be used as the basis for Dangerous Goods Laws in Australian States and Territories.  They have no legal standing until given effect by other legislation or regulations.

GHS implementation status

Implemented
The 3rd edition of the Explosives Code is consistent and harmonized with the 15th revised edition of the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods – Model Regulations and therefore implements the GHS for the transport of explosives.  

 

Agricultural sector (pesticides and veterinary products)

Focal point:

Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA)

Main relevant legislation:

Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Act 1994 (No.36 of 1994)
Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Code Act 1994 (No.47 of 1994)

Scope:

Agricultural products: include chemicals which generally destroy/repel pests or plants.
Veterinary products: chemicals used to prevent, diagnose or treat diseases in animals.

GHS implementation milestones:

Product Safety and Integrity Committee (PSIC) is working with government and industry stakeholders to consider the GHS in the agricultural and veterinary chemical sector. PSIC comprises representatives of the agriculture departments in each state/territory, the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) and the Workplace Relations, Environment and Health Ministerial Councils.

The committee is considering the implications of the GHS for Australia’s risk-based labelling system for agricultural and veterinary chemicals. There are a number of potential options for the implementation of the GHS (or certain GHS components) within the existing regulatory framework and careful consideration of the impacts, costs and benefits of these options for stakeholders is necessary before any final decision is made.

The committee is cognisant of the cross sectoral nature of the regulatory framework, the involvement of partner agencies such as the Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts and the Department of Health and Ageing (Office of Chemical Safety and Environmental Health) and the need for a collective implementation approach. GHS implementation may also be influenced by other legislation including State Poisons legislation related to poisons scheduling and associated health-based labelling.

 

Industrial Chemicals

Focal point:

Ministry of Health and Ageing. Office of Chemical Safety and Environmental Health, National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS).

Main relevant legislation:

Industrial Chemicals (Notification and Assessment) Act 1989

Scope:

Industrial chemicals cover, for example, dyes, solvents, adhesives, plastics, laboratory chemicals, paints, as well as chemicals used in cleaning products and cosmetics and toiletries.

GHS implementation milestones

The Department of Health and Ageing supports adoption of GHS in respect to health effects elements. However, GHS has implications for the poisons scheduling of chemical substances and therefore the labelling (signal words, hazard and precautionary statements) of consumer products. The Department of Health and Ageing is consulting with other agencies to develop an integrated response for the adoption of the GHS in the industrial chemicals sector which may have implications for consumer products. The response is aimed at minimizing regulatory overlap and maintaining the requirements of existing State and Territory poisons legislation.

Currently, the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities provides GHS hazard classifications for aquatic toxicity in its assessment reports on industrial chemicals for the Australian Government regulator of industrial chemicals, NICNAS (National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme). Use of GHS classifications for ecotoxicity will likely be updated as work progresses on GHS as well as its implementation across other chemical sectors in Australia. NICNAS continues to classify chemicals in accordance with GHS criteria as part of ongoing situational analysis of the potential for the implementation of GHS in Australia.

For the environment sector, the joint federal-state chemicals working group (set up under the National framework for Chemicals Environmental Management in Australia) is developing input into how environmental issues in the various jurisdictions should be implemented under GHS.

 

Consumer Products Sector

Focal point:

Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA)

Main relevant legislation:

State/Territory Poisons Legislation
State/Territory Health Acts (in some jurisdictions)
Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Act 1994 (No.36 of 1994)
Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Code Act 1994 (No.47 of 1994)
Agricultural and Veterinary Chemical Products (Collection of Levy) Act 1994 (No. 41 of 1994)

Links to legislative texts are available at the APVMA website

Scope:

Consumer products include pesticide products used in household situations, general household products including detergents, cleaning and polishing agents etc and other products that contain scheduled poisons or are determined to require scheduling under State poisons legislation.

GHS implementation milestones

Department of Health and Ageing supports adoption of GHS in respect to health effects elements. However, GHS has implications for the poisons scheduling of chemical substances and therefore the labelling (signal words, hazard and precautionary statements) of consumer products including pesticides.

The Department of Health and Ageing is consulting with other agencies to develop an integrated response for the adoption of the GHS in the consumer product sector which minimizes regulatory overlap and maintains the requirements of existing State and Territory poisons legislation. A discussion paper exploring the issues and implications associated with the possible adoption of the GHS within the current regulatory framework has been published (“Adoption of the Globally Harmonised System for Classification and Labelling of Chemicals in Respect to Domestic and Consumer Chemicals Including Pesticides”).

Austria

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (since 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Belgium

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

See European Union and European Economic Area

Bolivia

Focal point:

Ministry of Planning and Sustainable Development

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

The ANDEAN Community (Comunidad Andina) (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) have developed draft regulations based on the 13th revised edition of the UN Model regulations, the ADR 2005 and the RID 2005, which are still under consideration.

Other sectors

 

Bolivia is developing a National Plan of implementation of the Stockholm Convention. Several workshops and seminars were organized to raise awareness about the consequences of mishandling and misuse of chemicals and it is expected that work on the GHS will start once the National Plan has been completed.

Brazil

Focal points:

Ministry of Labor and Employment
Ministry of Transport
Ministry of Health

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

The 12th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations has been implemented through national legislation.

GHS implementation status (other sectors )

2001-2006:

Sectorial diagnostics and comparative studies were carried out by many public and private institutions with the objective of identifying current gaps in existing legislation.
Situation and gap analisys completed during this period.

2007-2008:

Implementation of the methodology for the application of the Comprehensibility Testing Study.
Release of the following draft standards based on the GHS for public consultation:
- Project 10:101.05-002: Labelling of chemicals;
- Project 10:101.05-003: Classification of chemicals;
- Project 10:101.05-004: Terminology;
- Project ABNT NBR 14725: Update of the SDS.

2009

Publication of standard ABNT NRB 14725:2009 (based on the GHS). The Standard has 4 parts, as follows:
- ABNT NRB 14725-1:2009 Terminology
- ABNT NRB 14725-2:2009 Hazard Classification System
- ABNT NRB 14725-3:2009 Labelling
- ABNT NRB 14725-4:2009 Safety Data Sheet or FISPQ

Release of the first revised edition of the GHS in Portuguese for public comments
Review of Ordinance No.26 (on hazard communication) of the Ministry of Labor, to bring it into line with the GHS.

2010

Publication of  several amendments/Corrections to Standard ABNT NRB 14725:2009

2011

As of  27 February 2011:

(a) For pure substances:

classification must be done using NBR 14725-2:2009,  packing and labelling using NBR 14725-3:2009 and SDS must be authored using NBR 14725-4:2009

(b) For mixtures:

The use of standard NRB 14725:2009 is optional until 31 May 2015. As from 1 June 2015, all mixtures must be classified, packed and labelled in accordance with NRB 14725-2 and 3 respectively and SDS authored using NBR 14725-4:2009.

Brunei Darussalam

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Brunei Darussalam is in the process of undertaking a situation and gap analysis to review the current chemical management system as a whole.

Several challenges are needed to both chemicals management and GHS implementation. First, present regulations are confined to pesticides. Second, controls on other chemicals are based on institutional measures, where a number of various agencies deal with chemicals, but need further coordination. Third, the majority of industry is small and medium size enterprises which lack capacity. Fourth, labelling awareness among stakeholders and users is low.

There are opportunities for GHS implementation, but the first step is to review the overall chemical management system.

Bulgaria

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

See European Union and European Economic Area

Cambodia

Focal points:

Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries;
Ministry of Industry, Mine and Energy;
Ministry of Public Works and Transportation;
Ministry of Health, Labour and Occupational Training;

GHS implementation milestones (all sectors)

From 2006 to 2008, Cambodia participated as a pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme. The programme was established for the development of a draft GHS legislation (Sub-Decree) for four sectors (industrial workplace, agriculture, transport, and consumer products) and the development of a strategic plan for national GHS implementation. It also included the organization of awareness raising activities for public interest, labour organizations, business and industry groups.

Canada

GHS implementation could impact all sectors (transport, industrial/workplace chemicals, consumer products, pest control products). Implementation plans are based on the first revised edition of the GHS (GHS-Rev.1, 2005).

Workplace

Focal point:

Department of Health: National Officer of WHMIS (Workplace hazardous materials information system). Product Safety Programme

Main relevant legislation:

Hazardous Product Act and associated Controlled Products Regulations

Transport of dangerous goods

Focal point:

Department of transport: Transport of Dangerous Goods Directorate

Main relevant legislation:

Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 and Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations

GHS implementation status

Implemented
Amendment 6 to the Canadian transportation of dangerous goods regulations entered into force on 20 February 2008, following its publication in Part II of the Canada Gazette.

The regulations, as amended, are based on the 14th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations (except for the Dangerous Goods List, which will be updated to the 15th revised edition in Amendment 8). Detailed information about the regulatory proposals under development is available at Transport Canada website.

For international transport of dangerous goods see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Consumer Products

Focal point:

Department of Health: Consumer Product Safety Bureau, Product Safety Programme

Main relevant legislation:

Consumer Product Safety Act and associated Consumer Chemicals and Container Regulations, 2001

Pesticides

Focal point:

Department of Health: Pest Management Regulatory Agency

Main relevant legislation:

Pest Control Products Act and associated regulations

GHS implementation milestones (workplace, consumer products and pesticides)

2003:

Completion of the situation analysis (by sector) which compared existing hazard communication requirements to the GHS. Multi-stakeholder workshop to introduce and launch work on GHS

2004-2005:

Multi-stakeholder technical consultations (pest control products, workplace chemicals, consumer products). Objective: achieve harmonization between sectors (to the greatest extent possible) and between trading partners.

2006:

Publication of a document containing a summary of the results of the multi-stakeholder technical consultations (up to February 2006): "Comparison of Sector Interim Recommendations or Preferred Options".

2007 - 2012:

Technical consultations and further development of Interim Recommendations; development of final recommendations, draft regulations; 

2013:

Publication of a draft proposal for the implementation of the GHS for workplace chemicals. A summary of the proposal may be accessed on the website of Health Canada. The full text of the proposal is available by request and is open for public comment until 15 September 2013.

Chile

Focal point:

Ministry of Health

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors:

 

2008:

Draft Regulation for the storage of hazardous chemicals (Anteproyecto de Reglamento de Almacenamiento de Sustancias Químicas Peligrosas) released for public consultation.

2012 and beyond (expected activities and outcomes):

Establishment of GHS coordination committee with participation of representatives from the government and private and public sectors.
A 3-day introductory workshop on the GHS was conducted in 2012.
Situation and gap analysis study already initiated (expected to be completed during the first half of 2013), prior to the development of a National Strategy for GHS implementation.
Several training workshops on GHS (based on UNITAR’s GHS basic training course) are expected to be conducted from June to August 2013.
Development of a GHS dedicated website (www.ghs-chile.cl) with information about GHS-related initiatives already undertaken, planned or being conducted in the country.

China

Focal point:

Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT)

Main current legislation

Regulations on Safe Management of hazardous Chemicals (revised in 2002)
List of Dangerous Goods (GB12268-2005)
Classification and code of dangerous goods (GB6944-2005)
Classification and labelling of commonly used dangerous chemicals (GB13690-1992) (under revision)
Guidelines for the hazard evaluation of new substances (HJ/T154-2004) (Chinese)
General rules for preparation of precautionary labels for chemicals (GB15258-1999) (under revision)
Rule for storage of chemicals (GB15603-1995)
General specifications for transport of dangerous goods (packages) (GB12463-90)
Labels for packages of dangerous goods (GB190-1990) (under revision)

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors:

 

2007:

At the 8th session of the Tripartite Environmental Ministers
Meeting (TEMM) held in Beijing, the ministers of the environment of China, Japan and Korea agreed on the establishment of a Tripartite Policy Dialogue on Chemicals Management, which includes holding regular meetings of a working group of experts on the GHS.
First meeting of the Tripartite Policy Dialogue (Tokyo).

2008:

Release of a draft national standard (“General rule for classification and hazard communication of chemicals”) implementing the GHS classification and labelling criteria (GHS Rev.2). The new standard replaces GB 13690-1992 and makes reference to safety rules GB20576 to 20602 for classification, precautionary labelling and precautionary statements of chemicals, in accordance with the GHS hazard classes and categories adopted.

Release of a draft national standard (“General rules for preparation of precautionary labels for chemicals”) replacing GB/T 15258-94 and GB15258-99 and applying GHS precautionary labelling.

GB/T 16483-2008 “SDS for chemical products - content and order of sections”. Revised to conform to GHS requirements for Safety Data Sheets. Replaces GB/T 17519.1-1998 and GB 16483-2000;

GB/T 22234-2008 “Labelling of chemicals according to the GHS”. Adopts the contents of the Japanese standard “JIS Z 7251:2006”;

GB/T 17159 Guidance for the preparation of SDS in accordance with the GHS.

Second meeting of the Tripartite Policy Dialogue (Seoul).

2009 - 2010:

Publication of the following standards implementing the GHS :

  • GB 190-2009 (packaging): implements the 15th revised edition of the UN recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods
  • GB T 16483–2008: Safety Data Sheet for chemical products content and order of sections (applicable as from 1 February 2009)
  • GB 13690–2009: General rules for preparation of precautionary labels for chemicals (applicable as from 1 May 2010)
  • GB 15258–2009 General rule for classification and hazard communication of chemicals  (applicable as from 1 May 2010).

 

2013:

Publication of 28 GHS complusory national standards (GB 30000-2013) fully aligned with GHS Rev.4. These standards replace current national standards (GB 20576-2006 to GB 20602-2006) and introduce two new hazards classes: Aspiration hazard and hazardous to the ozone layer. The implementation date for the new standards is 1 November 2014.

  • GB 30000.2-2013: Explosives
  • GB 30000.3-2013: Flammable gases
  • GB 30000.4-2013: Aerosols
  • GB 30000.5-2013: Oxidising gases
  • GB 30000.6-2013: Gases under pressure
  • GB 30000.7-2013: Flammable liquids
  • GB 30000.8-2013: Flammable solids
  • GB 30000.9-2013: Self-reactive substances and mixtures
  • GB 30000.10-2013: Pyrophoric liquids
  • GB 30000.11-2013: Pyrophoric solids
  • GB 30000.12-2013: Self-heating substances and mixtures
  • GB 30000.13-2013: Substances and mixtures which in contact with water release flammable gases
  • GB 30000.14-2013: Oxidizing liquids
  • GB 30000.15-2013: Oxidizing solids
  • GB 30000.16-2013: Organic peroxides
  • GB 30000.17-2013: Corrosive to metals
  • GB 30000.18-2013: Acute toxicity
  • GB 30000.19-2013: Skin/corrosion irritation
  • GB 30000.20-2013: Serious eye damage/irritation
  • GB 30000.21-2013: Respiratory or skin sensitization
  • GB 30000.22-2013: Germ cell mutagenicity
  • GB 30000.23-2013: Carcinogenicity
  • GB 30000.24-2013: Reproductive toxicity
  • GB 30000.25-2013: Specific target organ toxicity-Single exposure
  • GB 30000.26-2013: Specific target organ toxicity-Repeated exposure
  • GB 30000.27-2013: Aspiration hazard
  • GB 30000.28-2013: Hazardous to the aquatic environment
  • GB 30000.29-2013: Hazardous to the ozone layer

Colombia

Focal point:

Ministry of Transport
Ministry of Environment

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

The ANDEAN Community (Comunidad Andina) (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) have developed draft regulations based on the 13th revised edition of the UN Model regulations, the ADR 2005 and the RID 2005, which are still under consideration.

Other sectors:

No information available

Cyprus

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009) See European Union and European Economic Area

Czech Republic

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009) See European Union and European Economic Area

Denmark

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Ecuador

Focal point:

Ministry of Environment

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines The ANDEAN Community (Comunidad Andina) (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) have developed draft regulations based on the 13th revised edition of the UN Model regulations, the ADR 2005 and the RID 2005, which are still under consideration.

Other sectors:

 

 

A GHS workshop was organized by the Ministry of the Environment in March 2006.

National Technical Standard NTE INEN 2-266:2000 (Transport, storage and handling of hazardous materials-Specifications) has been revised in 2009 to incorporate GHS pictograms for packaging and labelling. The revised edition of the standard (NTE INEN 2-266:2000 (Primera revisión)) became mandatory in November 2009 (Official registry No. 107 of 13 January 2010).

Estonia

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Finland

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

France

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Gambia

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

During 2005-2007, Gambia participated as a pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme with the National Environment Agency serving as the coordinating organization at national level. Committee membership included key governmental departments as well as representatives of business and industry, and public interest and labor organizations.

A proposal for follow-up on GHS implementation activities was accepted for funding through the SAICM Quick Start Programme Trust Fund. It is expected that the next phase of GHS Capacity Building activities will focus on legal implementation and development of enforcement mechanisms.

Germany

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Greece

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Hungary

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Iceland

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Indonesia

Focal points:

Department of Industry
Department of Transportation
Department of Agriculture
Department of Trade
Department of Health
National Agency for Drug and Food Control
Department of Manpower and Transmigration
Ministry of Environment

Main relevant legislation:

GHS will be nationally implemented under a Presidential Decree.
The final draft of the decree has already been completed and it is currently under revision under the responsibility of the Ministry of Law and Human Rights. It is expected that other pieces of national legislation for chemicals management will be revised to be in line with the Presidential Decree.

GHS implementation milestones (all sectors)

 

National legislation for land transport of dangerous goods in Indonesia is based on the 14th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations and entered into force on 1 January 2007.
For international transport of dangerous goods see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines.

2005:

Participation (from 2005 – 2007) as a pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme;
Establishment of a National GHS Implementation Committee;
Completion of the Situation and Gap Analysis study;
Completion of the comprehensibility testing;

2006:

Issuance of two ministerial decrees in line with GHS provisions:

  • Minister of Trade Decree No. 04/2006 on Distribution and Control of Hazardous Substances (covering 54 chemicals potentially misused in food).
  • Minister of Industry Decree No. 24/2006 on Control of Production and Usage of Hazardous Substance for Industry (covering 6 chemicals substances)

Developing draft of Presidential Decree on GHS implementation.
Developing comic referred to the GHS pictograms.
Developing booklet on the basis of GHS provisions.
Starting translation of the GHS into Indonesian.

2007:

Classification of 100 chemicals in accordance with GHS classification criteria
Undertaking GHS training (intermediate level) for industries and government officers.
First draft GHS translation into Indonesian finalized.

2008 and beyond (expected activities and outcomes):

Peer review of the draft of GHS translation into Indonesian.
Final draft of GHS translation into Indonesian completed and publicized.
Issuance of Presidential Decree on GHS implementation.
Revision of other chemical regulations to be accordance with the Presidential Decree.
Undertaking GHS trainings for industries and government officers.
Developing a new comic on GHS.
Development of technical guidance/material for the implementation of the GHS (industry and consumer products)
Determining a list of priority chemicals for GHS implementation in industry, agriculture and consumer product sectors.
Law enforcement.

Ireland

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Italy

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Japan

Focal points:

Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW)
Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI)
Ministry of the Environment (MOE)
Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism

Main relevant legislation:

Industrial Safety and Health Law (ISHL)
Poisonous and Deleterious Substances Control Law (PDSCL)
Act on Confirmation, etc. of Release Amounts of Specific Chemical Substances in the Environment and Promotion of Improvements to the Management Thereof  (Law concerning Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR) and Safety Data Sheet (SDS) systems)
Act on the Evaluation of Chemical Substances and Regulation of Their Manufacture, etc (Evaluation concerning New Chemical Substances, Regulatory measures according to the properties of chemical substances, and Other measures including reporting of hazardous properties on chemical substances, etc.) (Chemical Substances Control Law (CSCL)). 

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
Marine and Air transport regulations in Japan are based on the UN Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods.
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines.

Other sectors:

 

2001-2004:

Situation and gap analysis;
Starting the translation of the GHS into Japanese;
Conducting several GHS awareness raising and capacity building activities at national and regional level
Set the meeting of relevant ministries and agencies involved in GHS implementation (Secretariat: Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare)

2005:

First edition of the GHS available in Japanese;
Amendment of the Industrial Safety and Health Law in order to implement GHS labelling and SDS requirements;
The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare starts recommending industries to apply GHS labelling in the framework of the Poisonous and Deleterious Substances Control Law, on a voluntary basis;
Publication of the National Standard JIS Z 7250:2005 (Safety Data Sheet for chemical products: Part 1 – Content and order of sections) in accordance with GHS;
Launching of the GHS classification project
Publication of the GHS classification manual and Technical Guidelines used for the classification project.

2006:

First revised edition of the GHS available in Japanese;
Publication of the National Standard JIS Z 7251:2006 (Labelling of chemicals based on GHS)
Entry into force of the amended Industrial Safety and Health Law (1 December 2006).

2007:

All classifications for substances under the Industrial Safety and health law, the Poisonous and Deleterious Substances Control Law and the Chemical Substances Control Law released on the National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE) website. The Government classification results are not mandatory.
Second revised edition of the GHS available in Japanese.
At the 8th session of the Tripartite Environmental Ministers Meeting  (TEMM) held in Beijing, the ministers of the environment of China, Japan and Korea agreed on the establishment of a Tripartite Policy Dialogue on Chemicals Management, which includes holding regular meetings of a working group of experts on the GHS.
First meeting of the Tripartite Policy Dialogue (Tokyo).
GHS labelling become acceptable as part of the labelling required for Class 2 specified chemical substances under the Chemical Substances Control Law.

2008:

On-line tool for the classification of mixtures;  
Revised edition of the GHS classification manual and Technical Guidelines used for the classification project;
Classification results of 1500 substances made available in English on NITE website.
Additional 149 substances classified with results made available in Japanese.
Second meeting of the Tripartite Policy Dialogue (Seoul).

2009:

Publication of the National Standard JIS Z 7252 (Classification of chemicals based on GHS);
Third revised edition of the GHS available in Japanese;
Classification for 417 substances;
Publication of GHS classification guidance (in place of GHS classification manual and technical guidelines)

2010:

Revised edition of JIS Z 7250 (Safety Data Sheet for chemical products) and JIS Z 7251 (Labelling of chemicals based on GHS)
Second edition of GHS Classification Guidance
Classification for 254 substances.

2011:

Fourth revised edition of the GHS available in Japanese.
Classification for 221 substances.

2012:

Publication of the National Standard JIS Z 7253 (Hazard communication of chemicals based on GHS-Labelling and Safety Data Sheet (SDS)) (Integrate JIS Z 7250 and JIS Z7251, to add information about workplace labelling, and to be consistent with GHS 4th revised version).
Amendment of the ordinance and guideline under Pollutant Release and Transfer Register Law to implement GHS labelling and SDS requirement for 562 designated chemicals
Obligation:The information in the SDS is expanded to 16 headings corresponding to GHS.
Effort-obligation: Provision of labelling is added. Provision of labelling and SDS followed by JISZ 7253.
 
Amendment of the ordinance under Industrial Safety and Health Law to enhance bussiness operators to supply all hazardous chemicals with GHS labelling and SDS.
Obligation (ISHL): labelling for 107 chemicals and SDS for 640 chemicals.
Effort-obligation (ordinance): labelling and SDS for all other hazardous chemicals (excluding environmental hazards).
 
Classification for 168 substances.

Lao People's Democratic Republic

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

 

Lao People's Democratic Republic has drafted the Hazardous Chemical Strategic Plan for 2006-2020 and the Hazardous Chemical Action Plan for 2006-2010. These Plans are designed to provide a framework for the safe and effective management of chemicals.

In terms of the GHS, Lao People's Democratic Republic has begun to draft a project proposal and has set up a National Steering Committee. The results of the comprehensibility training (held in October 2006) as well as those of the situation and gap analysis were used for the development of GHS implementation activities during 2007.

Sectoral implementation plans for health, agriculture and industry as well as a National Implementation Strategy for the transport sector were completed during 2009.

A decree stipulating principles, rules and measures for controlling all activities relating to import, export, production, distribution, storage, use and disposal of pesticides was issued and translated into English. Several awareness raising activities were also conducted during 2009.

Latvia

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Liechtenstein

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Lithuania

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Luxembourg

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Madagascar

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

The Ministry of Environment, Water and Forests made presentations on the GHS during workshops on chemical conventions and the IFCS held in Madagascar in 2004. The workshops attracted a wide range of public and private sector participants, included from industry, health, labour and agriculture. These presentations served as a key awareness raising tool for the new system.

Malaysia

Focal points:

Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI)
Ministry of Human Resources– Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH)
Ministry and Department of Agriculture. Pesticides Board
Ministry of Transport
Ministry of Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (NRE): Department of Environment (DOE)

Main relevant legislation:

Occupational Safety and Health Act (1994) and related legislation, i.e:
- Regulations on classification, packaging and labelling of hazardous chemicals (1997);
- Guidelines for the classification of hazardous chemicals (1997);
- Guidelines for the labelling of hazardous chemicals (1997);
- Guidelines for the formulation of a chemical safety data sheet (1997)
Pesticides Act (1974) (amended 2004)
Consumer Protection Act 1999
Environmental Quality Act (1974) and subsidiary legislation

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For national transport of dangerous goods: The 12th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations has been adopted as a national standard.

Other sectors:

 

2006-2008:

First national committee for GHS (NCC-GHS) implementation held on 2006.
GHS conference for ASEAN countries organized in Kuala Lumpur in cooperation with UNITAR.
The Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) will develop guidance for the classification, labelling, packaging of chemicals according to the GHS.
The Pesticide Board is in contact with FAO regarding implementation of GHS for pesticides.

2009 and beyond
(expected activities and outcomes)

Translation of the GHS into Malay;
Completion of a draft regulation for the implementation of the GHS to workplace chemicals (recommended date of entry into force, still to be confirmed: 2010 for substances and 2013 for mixtures)

Malta

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Mauritius

GHS implementation status

Implemented (as from 5 November 2004)

Main relevant legislation (all sectors):

Dangerous Chemicals Control Act 2004 (based on the first edition of the GHS) and related regulations.
- Classification and labelling: Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eight and Ninth Schedules;
- Packaging: Tenth Schedules;
- Safety Data Sheets: Eleventh Schedule;
- Transport: Fifteenth Schedule;
- Storage: Sixteenth Schedule
For international transport of dangerous goods see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Additional information:

Government of Mauritius

Mexico

GHS implementation milestones

Transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines.

Other sectors

0n 3 June 2011, a national standard (NMX-R-019-SCFI-2011) based on the 3rd revised edition of the GHS was published in the Official Gazette. It may be applied as from the day following its publication (i.e. 4 June 2011).

The standard establishes the criteria for the classification and labelling of chemicals and the preparation of Safety Data Sheets according to the GHS and contains 13 chapters and six annexes.

Although the standard is not mandatory, it is authorized to be used as an alternate means to comply with the provisions of Chapters 7 and 8 of the mandatory standard NOM-018-STPS-2000, addressing the identification of chemical hazards and its related hazard communication at the workplace. 

Myanmar

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Myanmar established the National Commission for Environmental Affairs, in 1990. Among its programs, Myanmar has adopted Agenda 21, one part of which is to promote the environmentally sound management of toxic chemicals and hazardous waste. There is no specific institution assigned to the task of overall management of chemicals and waste, but there are a number of existing frameworks in legislation, classification and labelling standards that could accommodate the GHS.

Myanmar is currently preparing to revise existing legislation and administrative procedures to implement the GHS.

Netherlands

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

New Zealand

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods:

Implemented
For national land transport of dangerous goods: Land Transport Rule: Dangerous Goods 2005  (Rule 45001/1), as amended by Rule 45001/2

For international transport of dangerous goods see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Focal point

New Zealand Transport Agency

Main relevant legislation

The requirements for controlling the transport of dangerous goods on land are based on the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods – Model Regulations (UNRTDG). The principal New Zealand legislation in this area is the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 (HSNO) and the regulations made under that Act. These impose requirements for all phases of the life cycle of hazardous substances. Generally, regulations made under the HSNO recognise compliance with the Rule as compliance with HSNO for land transport.

The Land Transport Rule: Dangerous Goods Amendment 2010 (Rule 45001/2) came into force on 1 April 2010. It amends Land Transport Rule: Dangerous Goods 2005 (the Dangerous Goods Rule), which sets out requirements for the safe transport of dangerous goods on land in New Zealand. The Dangerous Goods Rule covers the packaging, identification and documentation of dangerous goods, the segregation of incompatible goods, transport procedures and the training and responsibilities of those involved in the transport of dangerous goods. The amendment Rule is aligned with the 15th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations:

  • takes account of the inclusion in the United Nations Recommendations for the Transport of Dangerous Goods – Model Regulations (UNRTDG) of provisions for substances that are toxic to the aquatic environment;
  • ensures that the Dangerous Goods Rule is consistent with current requirements in the UNRTDG and the New Zealand Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996;
  • includes provision for dangerous goods in excepted quantities as introduced in the 15th revised edition of the UNRTDG;
  • clarifies or modifies existing provisions in the Dangerous Goods Rule for the purpose of aiding compliance.

 

Other sectors:

Implemented since 2 July 2001.

Applicable to all (new and existing) substances since 1 July 2006.

For labelling, in order to better align New Zealand’s implementation timetable for GHS with those of its major trading partners, an additional provision will allow for acceptance of labelling in accordance with the requirements of specified overseas jurisdictions until the end of 2010.

For SDS, the Safety Data Sheet code of practice (the Code of practice: Preparation of Safety Data Sheets (HSNOCOP 8-1)) adopts the 16 header SDS format and is consistent with the guidance provided in Annex 4 of the GHS.

Focal points:

Environmental Risk Management Authority (ERMA) New Zealand;
Ministry for the Environment;
Department of Labour: Health and Safety Section;

Main relevant legislation:

Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act 1996 and related regulations and codes of practice.
Health and Safety Employment (HSE) Act 1992 (amended in 2002)
Resource Management Act (RMA)1991 (on identification, labelling and packaging of hazardous substances)

Additional information

The Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act 1996 and related regulations control the import, manufacture or use (including disposal) of manufactured chemicals that have hazardous properties. The hazardous properties (defined in accordance with GHS criteria) are: explosive; flammable; oxidizing; toxic; corrosive; and ecotoxic.

HSNO controls apply at all stages in the manufacture, use and disposal of hazardous substances. Regulations cover: packaging; disposal; tracking; personnel qualifications; emergency management; and identification.

ERMA New Zealand, in conjunction with the Ministry for the Environment, has initiated work towards the revision of the hazardous substances classification framework under the HSNO Act (the Hazardous Substances (Minimum Degrees of Hazard) Regulations 2001 and the Hazardous Substances (Classification) Regulations 2001) to bring it into line with the 3rd revised edition of the GHS.

A chemical classification information database (CCID) containing chemicals classified by ERMA New Zealand in accordance with HSNO regulations (which are based on the GHS) is available. Classifications are provided for both the physical hazards (explosiveness, flammability, oxidizing capacity, metal corrosiveness) and biological hazards (toxicity, biological corrosiveness and ecotoxicity) of a chemical.  

The HSNO hazard classification system is substantially equivalent to the United Nations Globally Harmonized System for classification of chemicals (GHS): see the correlation of the HSNO classification categories with those of the GHS.

There is also an Inventory of Chemicals (NZIoC) which contains the list of chemicals for which notification and approval is required according to Part 6A of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act 1996.

Nigeria

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

During 2005-2007, Nigeria participated as a pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme.

A National GHS Planning Meeting was held in 2005 to discuss infrastructure and development of the GHS project. The National GHS Coordinating Agency is the Federal Ministry of Environment and members of the GHS Implementation Committee include key governmental departments and representatives of business and industry, and public interest and labour organizations.

Nigeria has being working since April 2006 in the development of a harmonized Hazardous Chemicals Management Bill. The draft Act was subject to a sectoral review process for multi-stakeholder input during the first quarter of 2007. This process lead to the development of a strategic plan for national GHS implementation in 2008.

Norway

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area../trans/danger/publi/ghs/implementation_e.html#European Union and European Economic Area

Paraguay

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

The Common Market of the South (MERCOSUR) countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay) are applying an agreement on the inland transport of dangerous goods (Acuerdo sobre Transporte de Mercancías Peligrosas en el MERCOSUR, 1994) which is based on the 7th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations and which is being updated on the basis of the 12th revised edition.

Other sectors

No information available

Peru

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

The ANDEAN Community (Comunidad Andina) (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) have developed draft regulations based on the 13th revised edition of the UN Model regulations, the ADR 2005 and the RID 2005, which are still under consideration.

Other sectors

No information available

Philippines

Focal points:

Board of Investments (BOI): lead agency, responsible for coordinating, monitoring and providing guidance on the implementation of GHS.
Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority (FPA): responsible for amending the existing classification and labeling guidelines for pesticides following the guidelines to be developed by WHO and FAO.
Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Environmental Management Bureau (EMB): responsible for the preparation of implementing rules and regulations (IRR) for industrial chemicals
Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), Bureau of Working Conditions (BWC): responsible for drafting the amendments to the Occupational Safety and Health Standards (OSHS) for GHS implementation in the workplace;
Occupational Safety and Health Center (OSHC): responsible for the development of information materials and training modules on GHS for capability building of concerned government and private sector;
Food and Drug Administration (FDA):  responsible for the preparation of IRR for consumer chemicals;
Bureau of Product Standards (BPS): responsible for the preparation of label standards for chemical substances and mixtures for consumer products.
Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) through its several attached agencies: responsible for the implementation of GHS in the transport sector through the UN Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods.
Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP): in-charge of emergency response, responsible for drafting the amendments to the IRR of the Revised Fire Code of the Philippines.  Also responsible in the conduct of inspection and in prescribing safety measures on the storage, handling and/or use of explosives or of combustible, flammable, toxic and other hazardous materials.
Bureau of Customs (BOC):  responsible for monitoring the import and export of all kinds of chemical substances, mixtures and products, except in economic zones.
Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA): responsible for monitoring inside the economic zones the importation and export of all kinds of chemical substances, mixtures and products.

Relevant legislation:

Toxic Substances and Hazardous and Nuclear Wastes Control Act of 1990 (Republic Act No.6969): for industrial chemicals;
Rule 1090 of the Occupational Safety and Health Standards (OSHS) entitled “Hazardous Materials”: for GHS implementation in the workplace;
Food and Drug Administration Act of 2009 (Republic Act No. 9711): for consumer chemicals;
Consumer Act of the Philippines (Republic Act No. 7394): for consumer products/chemicals;
Article V of the Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority Rules and Regulations: for pesticides;
Revised Fire Code of the Philippines of 2008 (Republic Act No. 9514): for emergency response.

GHS implementation milestones (all sectors)

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

A national GHS Implementation Committee was created in 2004.
During 2005-2007, Philippines participated as pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme
Situation and Gap analysis for transport, agrochemical industry, workplace chemicals and consumer products sectors completed.
Comprehensibility testing training conducted in 2005.

A GHS Joint Administrative Order for the adoption and implementation of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS JAO) was approved by the eight governmental agencies involved in GHS implementation on 25 May 2009. The GHS JAO requires implementing agencies to draft or revise their respective implementing rules and regulations (IRRs) or department orders, as the case may be, to incorporate the provisions of GHS. It also specifies the duties and responsibilities of the GHS implementing and coordinating government agencies in the adoption of the GHS classification criteria, labelling, and SDS requirements.

The Environmental Management Bureau has already prepared the draft DENR GHS Department Administrative Order (DAO) for the GHS implementation of industrial chemicals.  The draft DAO has already undergone several consultations with stakeholders.  

The Bureau of Working Conditions has already finalized draft amendments to Rule 1090 of the Occupational Safety and Health Standards (OSHS) entitled “Hazardous Materials” for GHS implementation in the workplace.   The draft will be presented to the stakeholders in a tripartite consultation, after which the same will be published for the information of all concerned.

The Bureau of Customs has also issued a Memorandum Circular (CMC) to implement the provisions of GHS.

A wide range of GHS training and capacity building activities have been conducted since 2006 to 2010 such as: Training Seminars/Workshops on GHS (Basic, Intermediate and/or advanced level) for employees, SMEs, manufacturers, importers, distributors, traders, retailers, repackers, transporters, emergency responders, chemistry students and faculty, and government regulators. In-house trainings on GHS labeling and preparation of Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

IEC materials on GHS such as pictogram, posters, brochures, resource CD and chemical safety tips were reproduced and distributed by the government, industry and civil society.  An information campaign through different media (radio, TV and focus group discussions and media releases) was also made to broaden the reach for public awareness.

Poland

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Portugal

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area../trans/danger/publi/ghs/implementation_e.html#European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Republic of Korea

Focal points:

Ministry of Labor (MOL)
Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA)
Korean Agency for Technology and Standards (KATS)
Ministry of Environment (MOE)
National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER)
National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA)
Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs

Main relevant legislation:

Industrial Safety and Health Act (ISHA);
Toxic Chemicals Control Act (TCCA);
Dangerous Goods Safety Management Act (DGSMA);
Standard KSM 1069:2006 (Labelling of Chemicals based on GHS)

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For national transport: Dangerous Goods Safety Management Act (DGSMA), which addresses classification and labelling of dangerous goods, and is based on the 15th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations.
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors:

 

Workplace

Implemented
Industrial Safety and Health Act (ISHA), revised in accordance with the GHS in Dec. 2006 (Notice No.2006-36) revised on Oct. 2009 (Notice No.2009-68) (classification and labelling and GHS-SDS),
Toxic Chemicals Control Act (TCCA), revised in accordance with the GHS in July 2008 (Classification and labelling for toxic chemicals).
Standard KSM 1069:2006 (Labelling of Chemicals based on GHS)

Transitional periods:
Deadline for classification of chemicals under the ISHA: 30 June 2010 for substances and 30 June 2013 for mixtures; (classification and labelling and GHS-SDS). During the transitional period, users may choose to use the revised ISHA (Notice 2009-68), which is based on the GHS, or continue using the previous notice (ISHA, Notice No. 1997-27).

The following GHS hazard categories are not adopted:

  • Flammable liquids: Category 4;
  • Acute toxicity: Category 5;
  • Skin Corrosion/Irritation: Sub-categories 1A, 1B, 1C and Category 3 (i.e: only Categories 1 and 2 are adopted);
  • Serious eye damage/eye irritation: Sub-category 2B (only Category 1 and sub-category 2A are adopted);
  • Aquatic toxicity: Acute 2 and 3.

Deadline for classification of existing chemicals according to the revised TCCA: 30 June 2011 for substances and 30 June 2013 for mixtures. Classification and labelling of new substances under the revised TCCA is mandatory since 1 July 2008.

Additional information

2003-2004:

Research projects to analyse the impact of GHS implementation;
Creation of an inter-ministerial Committee to coordinate the process of harmonization of existing legislation with the GHS;

2005-2006:

Publication of the first edition of the GHS in Korean;
Amendment of the Industrial Safety and Health Act;
Revision of public notice of the Ministry of Labor on “Standards for classification and labelling of chemical substances and Material Safety Data Sheets” ;
Publication of Standard KSM 1069:2006 (Labelling of Chemicals based on GHS);

2007:

Launching of a GHS classification and labelling project for 2500 chemicals;
Publication of the first revised edition of the GHS in Korean;
Revision of the Toxic Chemical Control Act in accordance with the GHS;
At the 8th session of the Tripartite Environmental Ministers Meeting (TEMM) held in Beijing, the ministers of the environment of China, Japan and Korea agreed on the establishment of a Tripartite Policy Dialogue on Chemicals Management, which includes holding regular meetings of a working group of experts on the GHS.
First meeting of the Tripartite Policy Dialogue (Tokyo).

2008:

Revision of public notice (Notice No. 2008-01) of the Ministry of Labor on “Standards for classification and labelling of chemical substances and Material Safety Data Sheets” in accordance with the second revised edition of the GHS;
Extension of the transitional period for reclassification of substances (until 30 June 2010) and mixtures (until 30 June 2013) under the ISHA (Notice No. 2008-29) for classification and labelling and GHS-SDS.
Release of a list of 3410 substances classified and labelled according to the GHS (for information only; classification not mandatory) at www.kosha.net (for members only);
Editing tools for creating SDS according to the GHS (Korean only) and labels (English and Korean) available at www.kosha.net (for members only);
Launching of a GHS classification and labelling project for mixtures;
Second meeting of the Tripartite Policy Dialogue (Seoul).
Amendment of the Dangerous Goods Safety Management Act in accordance with the GHS;

2009:

Release of the classification and labelling results and SDS (according to the GHS) for 11377 substances (for information only; classification not mandatory) at www.kosha.or.kr (for members only);
Provision of a SDS editing program for mixtures;
Provision of a GHS classification and labelling program for substances and mixtures;
Capacity building activities: Intensive course on classification and labelling and preparation of SDS;

2010:
(expected activities and outcomes)

Launching full implementation of GHS in the field of OSH for substances starting from 1 July 2010;
Expected release of the classification and labelling results and SDS (according to the GHS) for 13,200 substances (for information only; classification not mandatory) at www.kosha.or.kr;
Provision of a SDS editing program for mixtures;
Provision of a GHS classification and labelling program for substances and mixtures;
Assesment of GHS implementation status in workplaces (handling of substances) (MOL and KOSHA);

Romania

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area../trans/danger/publi/ghs/implementation_e.html#European Union and European Economic Area

Russian Federation

GHS implementation status

Focal points:

Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation (Minpromtorg)
Federal Agency for Technical Regulation and Metrology
Russian Researcher Center on Standartization, Certification and Testing of materials (FSUE VNICSMV)
Coordinating Informational Service Center for CIS enterprises (CISCenter)

Main relevant legislation

The GHS will be implemented at national level by means of a Technical Regulation "On safety of chemical products" (draft in eng).
The draft of this regulation has already been completed and it is currently under revision under the responsibility of the Ministry of Industry and Trade (Minpromtorg). It is expected that other pieces of national legislation for chemicals management will be revised to be aligned with the Technical Regulations.

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented

For domestic transport by road: Ordinance No.272 of 15 April 2011, requiring the application of Annexes A and B of ADR.


For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

The following seven GHS national standards have already been approved to support the technical regulations "on safety of chemical products":

  • GOST 30333-2007: Chemical production safety passport. General requirements (english version available here)
  • GOST 31340-2007: “Labelling of chemicals. General requirements”
  • GOST R 53856-2010: Classification of chemical hazards. General requirements
  • GOST R 53855-2010: Classification of chemicals hazardous due their physical and chemical properties. Test methods for explosives.
  • GOST 53854-2010: Classification of chemical mixtures for health hazards
  • GOST 53857-2010: Classification of chemicals for environmental hazards. General requirements
  • GOST 53858-2010: Classification of chemical mixtures for environmental hazards.

These standards will become mandatory only after entry into force of the Technical Regulation "on safety of chemical products" (which is expected to be approved by the end of 2011). The Technical Regulation will define a transitional period for the classification and labelling of chemicals according to the new standards.

It is expected that all GHS hazard classes and categories will be implemented.

Additional standards (in accordance with OECD guidelines) on testing of hazardous chemicals due to their physical and chemical properties and of chemicals dangerous for the environment are currently being developed.

Additional information on current and past activities related to the implementation of the GHS in the Russian Federation may be found at the Ciscenter website

Senegal

For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

During 2005-2007, Senegal participated as a pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme.

In 2005, Senegal, with coordination by the Ministry of Environment, initiated its GHS Capacity Building Project, including committee membership from key governmental departments and representatives of business and industry, and public interest and labour organizations. A National GHS Planning Meeting was held to discuss infrastructure and development of the GHS project. As part of the initial activities for the implementation of the GHS, Senegal undertook the national GHS situation and gap analysis and the comprehensibility testing training.

During the first half of 2007, a GHS implementing regulation (standards and "arrêté interministériel") was drafted. The draft text (which addresses the needs of four different sectors: agriculture, transport, industry and consumer goods), as amended (if necessary) by the relevant stakeholders, was expected to be presented for signature to the Ministers of Environment and Industry before the end of 2007.

Serbia

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

Implemented

National legislation implementing the GHS was adopted on 29 June 2010. It was published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Serbia on 10 September 2010 and entered into force on 18 September 2010. The competent authority for implementation of this legislation is the Serbian Chemicals Agency.

This GHS implementing legislation aligns Serbian system of classification, labelling and packaging of chemicals with the United Nations Globally Harmonized System (GHS) and is in compliance with EU CLP Regulation (Regulation (EC) 1272/2008). It will follow phase-in introduction of GHS system, allowing a transitional period for re-classification and re-labelling of substances until 30 September 2011 for substances and 31 May 2015 for mixtures.

A lot of GHS capacity building activities were undertaken in the last two years through activities within the project “Chemicals Risk Management in Serbia” with the Swedish chemicals agency in order to  establish effective implementation/enforcement of new legislation. A new project (“Assistance in Implementation of Chemical Management system in Serbia”) will start in September 2010. One of main activities under the project will cover the development of sustainable strategy for training on chemicals management, including GHS classification and labelling allowing stakeholders to gain experience with GHS implementation and chemicals management in a practical “learning by doing” approach.

Singapore

Focal points:

Ministry of Manpower (MOM): Workplace Safety and Health Advisory Committee (WSHAC)
Ministry of Transport (MOT)
Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources (MEWR)
Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI): Standards Productivity and Innovation Board (SPRING)

Main relevant legislation:

Environmental Protection and Management Act (EPMA) and related Regulations
Workplace Safety and Health Act 2006 and subsidiary legislation
Dangerous Goods, Petroleum and Explosives Regulations, 2007
Singapore Standard SS 586 (Parts 1, 2 and 3)

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
Transport of Dangerous Goods legislation in Singapore is based on the UN Model Regulations and related international instruments.

Other sectors

 

2005:

Establishment of a multi-agency public-private GHS implementation taskforce in 2005 to oversee and coordinate the implementation of the GHS in Singapore. All government agencies impacted by GHS as well as chemical industry representatives are members of the taskforce. The GHS implementation taskforce has agreed to focus on training and capacity building. This process of awareness raising started in April 2005 through channels such as business association newsletters, training courses, public seminars and conferences.

2006:

Revision of the Workplace Safety and Health Act to incorporate changes to the Safety Data Sheet requirements.
Development of an internet portal to help companies check for SDS compliance.

2007:

Publication of Singapore Standard SS 532:2007 (Code of practice for the storage of flammable liquids).

It replaces former SS CP40:1987 (Storage of flammable and combustible liquids) and covers flammable liquids classified and labeled according to the GHS.

2008:

Publication of Singapore Standard SS 586 to provide guidance on the classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals in accordance with GHS criteria.

SS 586 is the result of the revision of two earlier standards – SS 286: 1984 on “Caution Labelling for Hazardous Substances” (5 parts) and CP 98: 2003 on “Preparation and Use of Material Safety Data Sheets” (MSDS).

SS586 - 1: 2008 “Transport and storage of dangerous goods”
Adopts the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and provides standard hazard communication labels. Applies to the transportation and storage of dangerous goods by road in Singapore.

SS586 - 2: 2008 “Globally harmonized system of classification and labelling of chemicals- Singapore’s adaptations”
Adopts the United Nation Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, which provides an international system for the classification of chemicals by the types of hazards that they present. Also provides standard hazard communication elements including labels and safety data sheets.

SS 586 - 3: 2008 “Specification for hazard communication for hazardous chemicals and dangerous goods - Preparation of safety data sheets (SDS)”. The standard gives recommendations for the preparation, review, issue and use of SDS in accordance with the GHS.

Slovakia

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area../trans/danger/publi/ghs/implementation_e.html#European Union and European Economic Area

Slovenia

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

South Africa

Focal points:

Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
Department of Transport
Department of Labour
South Africa Bureau of Standards
Department of Trade and Industry

Main relevant legislation:

Hazardous Chemical Substances Regulations (1995) of the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act No.55 of 1993
National Environmental Management Act No. 10 of 1998,
National Road Traffic Act No. 93 of 1996

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines Transport of dangerous goods legislation in South Africa is based on the UN Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and related legal instruments.

Other sectors

 

2002-2006:

South Africa participated as a pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme. As part of the programme a study on the implications of implementing the GHS and the development of an implementation strategy for South Africa was concluded in December 2003.

Furthermore this study included an implementation plan for the GHS in South Africa which was prepared under the auspices of the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC) and co-funded and supported by UNITAR.

2007:

Review of legislation (for classification and labelling of chemicals and Safety Data Sheets) as well as policy instruments to ensure alignment with the GHS requirements.

Development of a national standard on the GHS (SANS 10234) intended to be referred to in the above-mentioned legislation and to be used as the basis for the development of a harmonized SADC standard by the Southern African Community Standardization body (SADCSTAN). Release of a draft regulation on Classification and Labelling of Chemical Substances for public comment.

2008:

Publication of the national standard on the GHS (SANS 10234:2008 - "Globally Harmonized System of classification and labelling of chemicals")

Completion of the new regulation on Classification and Labelling of Chemical Substances: Comments provided during the public comment period were considered and incorporated into the draft regulation as appropriate. The new regulation has been recommended for promulgation to the Minister of Labour. It provides that compliance with the national standard on the GHS and the current national system is allowed during the transition period so that the transition at a national level is facilitated while at the same time accommodating international trade requirements. The transitional period has been aligned with that of international trading partners and is now 3 years (2012) for substances and 7 years for mixtures (2016).

Publication of a list of classified chemical substances as a supplement to SANS 10234 (SANS 10234 Supplement: 2008 “List of classification and labeling of chemicals in accordance with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS)”).

2009-2010:

Following the promulgation of the GHS regulation, an inter-departmental committee will be established in 2009 by the Department of Labour to develop a coordinated legislative implementation strategy to ensure elimination of overlap of jurisdictional mandates. The harmonized legislative implementation strategy will include compliance and enforcement requirements, appropriate budget allocations, support to industry for transition and establishment of a permanent approach to ongoing input into international discussions and alignment of the effective dates of all legislative amendments.

GHS training will form an integral part of the safety, health and environment (SHE) unit standards currently being developed by a Working Group established by the Chemical Industries’ Education and Training Authority (CHIETA). The training issues raised in the implementation strategy should be referred to the SHE Unit Standard Working Group.

Awareness raising is to be undertaken at all forums dealing with chemical safety and once the Regulations have been promulgated, programmes focused on employers will be launched.

GHS elements will form an integral part of a program of accreditation of Health, Safety and the Environment (HSE). Specific courses to empower workers in understanding the elements of GHS within a specific Occupational Health and Safety focus should be developed.

Spain

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Sweden

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area../trans/danger/publi/ghs/implementation_e.html#European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area

Switzerland

Focal points:

Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH)
Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN)
State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO)
Federal Roads Office (FEDRO)
Federal Office for Agriculture (FOAG)

Main relevant legislation:

Supply and Use (Chemicals law and chemicals ordinance)
Transport of Dangerous Goods

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

2006-2008:

Beside its support for the Global WSSD GHS Partnership Program, Switzerland has also made progress in implementing GHS in its own country.

In 2006 consensus among all responsible authorities has been reached to implement GHS into Swiss legislation. This intention was also supported by all Swiss companies which have been interviewed in the context of an economic impact assessment. Thereby the implementation of the GHS, harmonised with the European Union in terms of contents, starting time and duration of the overall transition period, was considered as the most favorable option by all stakeholders. To meet these requirements the introduction of GHS in Switzerland will follow a multi-step process.

2009:

On 1 February 2009, entry into force of the amended Swiss chemicals ordinance with a view to facilitate trade of chemicals that are already labelled according to GHS.

The main element of this amendment is an option for Swiss manufacturers/importers to classify and label their chemicals according to the current system or according to the GHS. Once they choose the GHS-option the GHS standard of the EC according to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 is mandatory. However, additional hazard classes of the GHS are accepted on product labels.

At present, the GHS option is limited to products sold to professional users but an extension of the option to consumer products is planned at a later stage and will be supported by additional information for consumers.

2010 and beyond
(main expected activities and outcomes):

1 December 2010: Entry into force of revised ordinances SR 813.11 (on chemicals) and SR 813.12 (on biocidal products). The revision of the ordinance on chemicals allows the placing on the market of consumer products classified and labelled in accordance with the GHS and defines an overall transitional period for reclassification and labelling of substances (until 1 December 2012) and mixtures (until 1 June 2015), in accordance with European Union’s legislation. The revision of the ordinance on biocidal products allows biocidal products classified and labelled according to the GHS.

In the next years further steps will be necessary to fully implement the GHS. These include:

  • An obligation to classify and label all substances and mixtures according to GHS, including consumer products, biocides and pant protection products.
  • The introduction of transitional provisions for the reclassification of substances and mixtures and the abrogation of the current system (by 2015).
  • Amendment of Swiss downstream legislation acts (e.g. major accidents, cosmetics, toys, workplace requirements).

 

Thailand

Focal points:

Ministry of Public Health: Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Ministry of Industry: Department of Industrial Works (DIW);
Ministry of Transport (MOT);
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives (MOAC): Department of Agriculture (DOA)

Main relevant legislation:

Hazardous Substance Act of B.E.2535 (1992)
Factory Act
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives’s Notification Re: Label and toxic level of hazardous substances under Department of Agriculture control 1995 (B.E. 2538) (including the new one to be issued for Livestock Development Department), issued under the Hazardous Substance Act (HZA)
Ministry of Public Health’s Notification Re: Labels and toxic levels of hazardous substances under Food and Drug Administration control 1995 (B.E. 2538), issued under HZA
Ministry of Industry‘s Notification Re: Duty of Factory Enterprises 1987 (B.E. 2530), issued under Factory Act
Ministry of Interior’s Notification Re: Workplace safety related to dangerous substances 1991 (B.E. 2534), now under the responsibility of the Ministry of Labour;
Ministry of Industry’s Notification 2000 (B.E. 2543), issued under HZA, by modifying Form Vor Or/Or Kor 3 to be consistent with GHS SDS.
Ministry of Industry’s Regulation No. 3, 1992 (B.E. 2535), issued under Factory Act.

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

National legislation for the transport of dangerous goods in Thailand is based on the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous goods:

Thai Provision Volume I (TP-I) Re: General requirements for multi-modal transport of dangerous goods 2000 (B.E. 2543);
Thai Provision Volume II (TP-II) Re: Requirements for the transport of dangerous goods by road and rail 2004 (B.E. 2547).
Thai Provision Volume III (TP-III) Re: Requirements for the transport of dangerous goods by inland waterways

Other sectors

 

2004:

Creation of a National GHS Implementation Sub-Committee, under the Hazardous Substance Committee, with the participation of representatives from Government agencies and from stakeholder groups in business and industry, as well as public interest and labour organizations

2005-2006:

Launching of the National GHS Capacity Building UNITAR/ILO project
Participation as a pilot country (until 2007) in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme
Completion of the Gap analysis study and comprehensibility testing
Several GHS awareness raising and capacity building activities (such as seminars, training courses and development of educational/training tools)

2007:

First draft of the Notification of the Hazardous Substance Committee on GHS: System of Hazard Classification and Communication of Hazardous Substances 2007 (B.E.2250).
First draft of the Notification of Ministry of Industry 2007 (B.E.2250): System of Hazard Classification and Communication of Hazardous Substances.

from 2008 onwards:

Publication of the first revised edition of the GHS in Thai.
Development of GHS training kits, manuals and other guidance material for different sectors.
Development of a database for classification and hazard communication of chemicals (industrial sector) according to the GHS.
Development of a database of GHS compliant SDS.
Development of a database for classification and labelling of agricultural chemicals according to the GHS.
Development of a database for classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals (consumer sector) according to the GHS.
Capacity building and awareness raising activities for all sectors and audiences.

 

The Department of Industrial Works (DIW) finalized the drafting of Ministry of Industry’s Notification on System of Hazard Classification and Communication of Hazardous Substances and the attached Provision, based on the 3rd revised edition of the GHS (2009). The final draft was approved by the Hazardous Substance Committee on 3 August 2011 and the notification was published in the Royal Gazette of Thailand in March 2012.  Effective from 13 March 2012, the notification is based on the third revised edition of the GHS. It provides a transitional period for implementation from the effective date of entry into force of one year for substances and five years for mixtures (i.e.: substances will have to comply with the GHS provisions from 13 March 2013 and mixtures from 13 March 2017).

During 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized the drafting of Ministry of Public Health’s Notifications for GHS implementation for household or public health use chemicals. The public consultation period concluded in July 2011 and FDA is in the process of completing the process to have the notification submitted for consideration of the Hazardous Substance Committee and its final endorsement by the Ministry of Public Health.

A GHS Training Workshop was held from 20 to 23 September 2011 in Bangkok with the participation of 215 participants from government officials, academic and research institutes, business/industry associations in addition to labour, consumer, and civil society organizations, together with a large number of enterprises.

Thailand is one of the countries participating in a 3-year project funded by the European Union in the context of the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme. The project, which was initiated in January 2010, aims at strengthening national and regional capacities to implement the GHS in countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

United Kingdom

GHS implementation status

Transport of dngerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For domestic and intracommunitary traffic, see European Union and European Economic Area

Other sectors

Implemented (as from 20 January 2009)
See European Union and European Economic Area../trans/danger/publi/ghs/implementation_e.html#European Union and European Economic Area

United States of America

Workplace

Focal point:

Department of Labor: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Main relevant legislation:

Occupational Safety and Health Standards

GHS implementation milestones:

On 26 March 2012 the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) was published in the Federal Register.

The revised HCS is in line with the third revised edition of the GHS. It will become effective on 25 May 2012 although it will not become mandatory until 1 June 2015. During this phase-in period, and to give industry enough time to produce labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS) consistent with the revised provisions, employers will be allowed to use at their own discretion, the existing HCS, the revised one, or both.

Additional information and guidance is available at OSHA's website

Transport of dangerous goods

GHS implementation status

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines
For national transport: the regulations applicable to the transport of dangerous goods (Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations) have been updated to reflect the 15th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations, with very few exceptions.

Focal point:

Department of Transportation (DOT): Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA)

Main relevant legislation:

Hazardous Materials Regulations (Title 49 CFR Parts 100 -185)

Pesticides

Focal point:

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Pesticides Program ( Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances)

Main relevant legislation:

Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA)
Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA)

GHS implementation milestones:

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) outlined initial thinking on the potential application of the GHS to pesticide labels in a “White Paper” and solicited public comment on their plans through a notice published in the U.S. Federal Register. In October 2006, the EPA conducted a public meeting with stakeholders to review the issues raised in the White Paper and comments, and to solicit additional input on possible ways forward. EPA is reviewing next steps in light of the input received, seeking additional data, and exploring possibilities for GHS pilot activities. In 2007, EPA made major revisions in its communications materials and overhauled its GHS web site. Results of initial pilot activities were expected to become available in 2008.

Consumer Products

Focal point:

Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)

Main relevant legislation:

Consumer Product Safety Act
Federal Hazardous Substances Act

GHS implementation milestones

In 2007, CPSC compared selected portions of the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA) regulatory requirements to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for classification and labeling. This comparison identified some of the technical differences between the FHSA and GHS. A preliminary legal feasibility assessment was also conducted to assess what, if any, changes would be needed to the FHSA should certain provisions of the GHS be adopted and implemented. The staff work indicated that a more complete technical comparison is needed.

In 2008, CPSC initiated a contract to complete a side-by side comparison of the FHSA and the GHS. This review will determine which sections of the GHS might be considered for implementation, as well as whether statutory or regulatory changes would be necessary for eventual implementation.

Uruguay

Focal points:

Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Environment Directorate)

Main relevant legislation:

Workplace: Decree 346/011; Decree 307/009 and Decree 406/88;
Agricultural products: Decree 294/04
Transport of dangerous goods: Decree 560/03 and Decree 158/85;
Consumer's protection: Decree 180/00 (MERCOSUR/GMC/RES.49/99)

GHS implementation milestones

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

The Common Market of the South (MERCOSUR) countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay) are applying an agreement on the inland transport of dangerous goods (Acuerdo sobre Transporte de Mercancías Peligrosas en el MERCOSUR, 1994) which is based on the 7th revised edition of the UN Model Regulations and which is being updated on the basis of the 12th revised edition.

Workplace

Implemented

Decree 307/009 of 3 July 2009, on protection of health and safety of workers from chemical risks, establishes that labels and Safety Data Sheets shall conform to the GHS. The Decree entered into force on September 2009 (120 days after its publication on the Official Journal) with a transitional period of one year for provisions concerning labelling.

Decree 346/011 of 28 September 2011 amends Decree 307/009, among other things, to extend the transitional period for entry into force of labelling provisions and preparation of Safety Data Sheets in accordance with the GHS, as follows:

  • For substances (labelling): until 31 December 2012
  • For mixtures (labelling): until 31 December 2017

Decree 346/011 entered into force immediately after its publication and establishes in its article 7 that all industries falling within the scope of decree 307/009 shall design and apply a GHS implementation plan within the 6 months following its entry into force

Other activities

2005-2008:

GHS side event (organized by the Government of Uruguay, in collaboration with UNITAR) during the first meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP-1) of the Stockholm Convention in 2005. The establishment of a classification and labelling system based on the GHS was identified as a priority during the process of elaboration of a National Plan of implementation of the Stockholm Convention.
First national workshop on chemical hazard communication (August 2005);
GHS included as part of the courses on chemical safety for undergraduates (mandatory) and graduates (Faculty of Chemistry, National University).
At regional level, as a member of the MERCOSUR Ad Hoc Group on Chemicals (Environmental Area, Sub-Group 6), Uruguay identified GHS implementation as one of the six issues of highest priority for the region. Launching of the project “National awareness raising and capacity assessment for GHS implementation” with the support of UNITAR/ILO and the government of Switzerland.

2009 - 2011

Second national workshop on chemical hazard communication (April 2009);
Publication of Decree 307/009 of 3 July 2009, on protection of health and safety of workers from chemical risks, based on the GHS (includes provisions for labelling and preparation of SDS in accordance with the GHS), implementing the GHS at the workplace.
Promotion of the adoption of the GHS at MERCOSUR level, including the amendment and/or development of regional standards and capacity building activities.
Publication of Decree 346/011, amending Decree 307/009, notably to extend the transitional period for the implementation of GHS labelling at the workplace.

Vietnam

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

Standards for classification and labelling of chemicals have been in place in Viet Nam since 1999. There are a number of government ministries involved in chemicals management, including the Ministries of Trade, Industry, Transport, Health and Fisheries.

2012

The Ministry of Industry and Trade issued on 13 February 2012, circular No. 04/2012/TT-BCT, establishing classification and labelling requirements for substances and mixtures in line with GHS. The circular follows a number of earlier pieces of legislation implementing parts of the GHS and stipulates a transitional period for implementation of 2 and 4 years for substances and mixtures, respectively, from its effective entry into force, i.e:

Substances: as from 30 March 2014
Mixtures: as from 30 March 2016

Zambia

GHS implementation status

Transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
For international transport of dangerous goods, see Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

Other sectors

During 2001-2003, Zambia participated as a pilot country in the UNITAR/ILO Global GHS Capacity Building Programme
The first phase of the two-year phase pilot project for the implementation of the GHS at national level started in 2001. The results of the comprehensibility tests provided useful information on how to define and improve the hazard protection tools. Existing legislation was reviewed, gaps identified and new legislation drafted.
GHS-related activities for a UNITAR/SAICM Secretariat project on Strengthening Capacities for SAICM implementation and supporting GHS capacity building, are expected to take place in 2010-2011.

European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA)

The following 28 countries are Member States of the EU:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic , Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

The candidate countries Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Turkey already started to implement current legislation.

Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway are the members of the European Economic Area (EEA). The EEA Agreement allows them to participate in the EU Internal Market, while not assuming the full responsibilities of EU membership. All new Community legislation in areas covered by the EEA is integrated into the Agreement through an EEA Joint Committee decision and subsequently becomes part of the national legislation of the EEA EFTA States. This also apply to the EU Regulation which implements the GHS.

Focal points:

Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry
Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport
Environment Directorate-General
Directorate-General for Health and Consumers
European Chemicals Agency (ECHA)

Main relevant legislation:

For supply and use sectors:
Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 December 2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures, amending and repealing Directives 67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC, and amending Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006
REACH Regulation (EC) 1907/2006 (Regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals)

For transport of dangerous goods:
within or between EU Member States: Directive 2008/68/EC on the inland transport of dangerous goods

For international transport of dangerous goods between EU and non-EU Member States: see, Implementation through international legal instruments, recommendations, codes and guidelines

GHS implementation milestones (transport and supply and use sectors)

For transport of dangerous goods

Implemented
Directive 2008/68/EC applies to the transport of dangerous goods by road, by rail or by inland waterways within or between EU Member States. It makes direct reference to the relevant legal instruments implementing the provisions of the UN Model Regulations on the transport of Dangerous Goods by road, rail and inland waterways (i.e.: the European Agreement on the Transport of Dangerous Goods by road (ADR) and by inland waterways (ADN) and the Regulation concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by rail (RID)). 

The Directive entered into force on 20 October 2008. Following its adoption, the following directives were repealed:

Directives 94/55/EC and 96/49/EC (as amended) on the transport of dangerous goods; Directives 96/35/EC and 2000/18/EC on dangerous goods safety advisers; and

Commission Decisions 2005/263/EC and 2005/180/EC (as amended) on national derogations from Directives 94/55/EC and 96/49/EC.

Supply and use sectors

Implemented since 20 January 2009 (Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 (hereafter referred to as “the CLP Regulation”)

 

CLP Regulation

The CLP regulation defines a transitional period during which both the current legislation and the new Regulation will be in place. It stipulates that after entry into force, the deadline for reclassification of substances is 30 November 2010 and 31 May 2015 for mixtures. The Directives on classification, labelling and packaging, i.e. Council Directive 67/48/EEC and Directive 1999/45/EC, will be definitively repealed on 1 June 2015.

 

Adaptations to technical progress (ATP) to the CLP Regulation

The 1st ATP (Commission Regulation (EC) No 790/2009) entered into force on 25 September 2009. It transfers the 30th and 31st ATPs of Directive 67/548/EEC to the Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008. Suppliers should apply the harmonised classifications set in the 1st ATP and adapting the labelling and packaging provisions accordingly as of 1 December 2010 at the latest but are allowed to apply those harmonised classifications already before that date.

The 2nd ATP (Commission Regulation (EU) No 286/2011) entered into force on 19 April 2011. The text incorporates into the CLP the changes introduced by the 3rd revision of the GHS (e.g.: new sub-categories for respiratory and skin sensitisation, the revision of the classification criteria for long-term hazards (chronic toxicity) to the aquatic environment, and a new hazard class for substances and mixtures hazardous to the ozone layer and labelling provisions to protect individuals already sensitised to a specific chemical that may elicit a response at very low concentration).

The 3rd ATP (Commission Regulation (EU) No 618/2012) entered into force on 31 July 2012. The new rules apply from 1 December 2013 but may be applied voluntarily before that date. The aim is to update the list of substances with harmonised classification and labelling in Part 3 of Annex VI of the CLP Regulation.

The 4th ATP (Commission Regulation (EU) No 487/2013) aligns the CLP Regulation with the 4th revised edition of the GHS. It was published in the Official Journal of the European Union on 1 June 2013 and will enter into force on the 20th day following its publication. Its provisions shall apply in respect of substances from 1 December 2014 and in respect of mixtures from 1 June 2015.

The 5th ATP (Commission Regulation (EU) No 944/2013) includes in Annex VI to the regulation, new or updated harmonized classification and labelling for a number of substances. The new provisions entered into force on 24 October 2013 but would only apply after a transitional period.

 

Classification and Labelling Inventory

Article 42 of the CLP Regulation requires the European Chemicals Agency to establish and maintain a classification and labelling inventory in the form of a database (the so-called “Classification and Labelling Inventory”). It contains classification and labelling information on notified and registered substances received from manufacturers and importers. It also includes the list of harmonised classifications (Table 3.1 of Annex VI to the CLP Regulation). The information stored in the inventory is kept up-to-date by the Agency when updated or new information is submitted.

The first release of the Classification and Labelling Inventory was launched on 13 February 2012. A first refresh of the information stored in the database has already been published on 29 March 2012.

 

Safety Data Sheets

Annex II to the REACH Regulation which provides the requirements for the compilation of safety data sheets has been adapted to the provisions of the CLP regulation and aligned with the provisions of the GHS for Safety Data Sheets (Commission Regulation (EU) No 453/2010 of 20 May 2010).

 

Guidance and additional information

Guidance (both for industry and authorities use) on how to apply the provisions of the CLP Regulation is now available at the European Chemicals Agency website.

Directive 2008/112/EC and Regulation (EC) 1336/2008 implement the GHS in the following areas by amending the Directives listed hereafter:

  • Council Directive 76/768/EEC (cosmetic products);
  • Council Directive 88/378/EEC (safety of toys);
  • Council Directive 1999/13/EC (limitation of emissions of volatile organic compounds due to the use of organic solvents in certain activities and installations);
  • Directive 200/53/EC (end-of-life vehicles);
  • Directive 2002/96/EC (waste electrical and electronic equipment); and
  • Directive 2004/42/EC (limitation of emissions of volatile organic compounds due to the use of organic solvents in certain paints and varnishes and vehicle refinishing products);
  • Regulation (EC) No 648/2004 (detergents)

Additional information on current and past activities related to the implementation of the GHS in the European Union may be found at the European Commission’s website


© United Nations Economic Commissions for Europe – 2013